Why "off the mat" conditioning is a waste of valuable training time

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Guerrilla

Active Member
Apr 24, 2020
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I don't understand the relevance of BF %age to the discussion.

Regarding steady state cardio, you're entitled to your opinion but it is undeniable that the athletes who can maintain the highest power output at threshold are steady state endurance athletes. There are plenty of world class combat athletes who have used roadwork as a staple of their training regimen. My power at threshold increased 40% in 6 months when I switched to distance work.
Steady state cardio athletes have very low body fat and usually poor strength so they can't hang with the blast cardio requirements in MMA that require so much explosive strength that's why guys that average 20/30% body fat are so much more effective in the ring

Steady state cardio lowers your testosterone and makes you weaker however it does give you a boost in Slow Burn cardio so you have plenty of energy to go jogging after youve been beaten in the ring buy a guy who concentrates on sparring for conditioning and likely walks around at 30% body fat to maintain the body's muscle building and strength building processes

As a veteran wrestling coach I watched thousands of young athletes cut below 20% body fat and crash on the mat because their bodies switched into conservation mode not into Power building mode... roadwork is an Abomination and is simply an archaic Vestige of old school thought patterns
 
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Leigh

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Jan 26, 2015
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Steady state cardio athletes have very low body fat and usually poor strength so they can't hang with the blast cardio requirements in MMA that require so much explosive strength that's why guys that average 20/30% body fat are so much more effective in the ring
Ok, so we agree the guy in the video was wrong when he said endurance athletes are skinny-fat.

I agree with you that distance runners don't have high strength. This is because excess muscle is detrimental to their sport. But there are lots of athletes who do distance work that are NOT weak. Additionally, the assertion that low bodyfat means an athlete will have poor endurance in MMA is demonstrably false. There are many, many ripped athletes competing at the highest levels of the sport that have exceptional stamina. Athletes such as Sean Sherk, GSP, Demetrious Johnson, to name a few. I agree it's not a requirement, as Cain Velasquez and the Diaz brothers show.

The following are facts:
  1. Many athletes with low bodyfat have great cardio.
  2. Many athletes known for strength and explosive power do roadwork.
  3. Distance athletes generate the highest power at threshold.
I will absolutely agree that if you took a pure distance athlete and put them in an MMA match, they'd be physically underprepared. The same is true of a strength athlete or a sprint athlete. That doesn't mean there isn't a place in their training for these protocols, just don't take it to the extreme.
 

Guerrilla

Active Member
Apr 24, 2020
185
114
Ok, so we agree the guy in the video was wrong when he said endurance athletes are skinny-fat.

I agree with you that distance runners don't have high strength. This is because excess muscle is detrimental to their sport. But there are lots of athletes who do distance work that are NOT weak. Additionally, the assertion that low bodyfat means an athlete will have poor endurance in MMA is demonstrably false. There are many, many ripped athletes competing at the highest levels of the sport that have exceptional stamina. Athletes such as Sean Sherk, GSP, Demetrious Johnson, to name a few. I agree it's not a requirement, as Cain Velasquez and the Diaz brothers show.

The following are facts:
  1. Many athletes with low bodyfat have great cardio.
  2. Many athletes known for strength and explosive power do roadwork.
  3. Distance athletes generate the highest power at threshold.
I will absolutely agree that if you took a pure distance athlete and put them in an MMA match, they'd be physically underprepared. The same is true of a strength athlete or a sprint athlete. That doesn't mean there isn't a place in their training for these protocols, just don't take it to the extreme.
Yeah I don't agree with the "skinny fat" assertion I would call them just plain skinny as at that level as you pointed out it is a detriment to carry excess muscle mass in such a sport but I think you're leanness equating to cardio theory is a fallacy primarily perpetrated by the abuse of performance-enhancing drugs at the higher levels of competition

you clearly have a higher understanding of the science of sports conditioning so you know that when an athlete gets below 10% body fat their body switches into conservation mode and is going to try to burn muscle mass and save precious fat

I think that's the point he was making in the video when he called distance Runners "skinny fat"

In one of the state's I'm licensed as a professional Athletics coach it is actually a requirement to have a doctor's note for an athlete that tests under 5% body fat because it is understood as dangerously thin for athletic stress

In fact women that get down to 5% body fat will stop menstruating because their body understands that they are so dangerously lean that they would have a complicated gestation

The artificial stress we put on athletes to cut to a lower weight class is incredibly dangerous and has led to the sudden death of otherwise young and healthy athletes so I would focus on the heavyweight division as an example of the optimal conditioning potential of an MMA athlete and even the leanest of heavyweights step into the ring at 20% body fat commonly and most of the Champions overall have ranged in the 25 to 30