Are Chokes in MMA Dangerous For Brain Function? Doctors Debate the Issue

Discussion in 'Cageside - MMA Discussion' started by ErikMagraken, Jun 12, 2019.

  1. ErikMagraken

    ErikMagraken Well-Known Member

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    Originally published here - Are Chokes in MMA Dangerous For Brain Function? Doctors Debate the Issue
    _____________________________________________

    Earlier this year I highlighted debate among physicians addressing whether chokes in combat sports play any role in CTE.

    A more recent study was published in the journal of Brain Injury suggesting that MMA bouts (or training sessions) ending in a choking submission result in cognitive consequences similar to concussion. Like last year’s article this recent suggestion has received some pointed criticism.

    In the recent study, titled The King-Devick test in mixed martial arts: the immediate consequences of knock-outs, technical knock-outs, and chokes on brain functions, the authors looked at King-Devick times (an accepted concussion evaluation tool) in MMA trainees and competitors. They looked at training/bouts that ended via head trauma events and those that ended via submission events. The authors noted that both KO and non KO ‘events’ led to a slowing of King-Devick testing. From this they concluded that “athletes who sustained non-head trauma “events” also demonstrated slowing on their K-D tests, suggesting these “events” may also cause some impairment in
    brain function indicative of a concussion“.

    The full abstract and conclusion read as follows:

    ABSTRACT
    The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine the effect of an ‘event,’ defined as a knockout
    (KO), technical knock-out (TKO), choke, or submission, on King-Devick (K-D) test times in mixed
    martial arts (MMA) athletes. MMA athletes (28.3 ± 6.6 years, n = 92) underwent K-D testing prior to and
    following a workout or match. Comparison of baseline and post-workout/match K-D times to assess any
    significant change. K-D tests worsened (longer) in a majority of athletes following an ‘event’ (N = 21)
    (49.6 ± 7.8 s vs 46.6 ± 7.8 s, p = 0.0156, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). K-D tests improved (shorter)
    following a standard workout or match in which no ‘event’ occurred in a majority of cases (n = 69) (44.2
    ± 7.2 s vs 49.2 ± 10.9 s, p = <0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Longer duration (worsening) of postmatch
    K-D tests occurred in most athletes sustaining an ‘event’; K-D tests shortened (improved) in a
    majority of athletes not sustaining an ‘event’. Our study suggests MMA athletes suffering an ‘event’ may
    have sustained a brain injury similar to a concussion.

    Conclusion
    The vast majority of MMA athletes sustaining an “event” with
    witnessed head trauma (KO or TKO) had significant slowing
    of their K-D test. It is probable that slowing of the post-match
    or post-training K-D test in this population indicates that the
    athlete has sustained a concussive type brain injury.
    Furthermore, athletes who sustained non-head trauma
    “events” also demonstrated slowing on their K-D tests, suggesting
    these “events” may also cause some impairment in
    brain function indicative of a concussion. Our findings suggest
    that any MMA athlete with a slowed post-match or posttraining
    K-D test requires further evaluation by a medical
    professional trained in concussion management.

    This conclusion drew strong criticism from Samuel J. Stellpflug and Robert C. LeFevere of the Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, Saint Paul, MN, USA. In reply to the the above study the doctors summarized their criticism of the conclusions as follows:

    In summary, this study doesn’t establish a link between
    transient choking and significant worsening in K-D times, nor
    between transient chokes and anoxic brain injury with cerebral
    changes comparable to concussion. The listed supporting references
    don’t support either of these claims. Additionally, the brief
    hypoxia associated with transient chokes is analogous to brief
    vasovagal syncope, which does not cause lasting brain injury.
    Concussions involve a traumatic force causing injury that can
    have long-lasting effects. There is no established reason to
    believe, based on the different mechanisms, that brief hypoxia
    causes the lasting damage that a concussion can cause. Lastly,
    there is a limitation in terming these MMA chokes as nontraumatic
    scenarios when the totality of the physical transgressions
    that lead to the choke is taken into account. Overall, this
    study does not provide any convincing data that chokes in
    combat sports cause injuries to the brain similar to concussion.

    It would be of value to the combat sports community to have a study conducted involving grapplers who tap out due to chokes (who do not sustain any head impacts in the process as they would in an MMA competition) to see if the K-D scores are negatively impacted. Such a study can help further this debate and add clarity to the competing points of view.
     
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  2. Jesus X

    Jesus X my tools

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    sounds like a deviant sex act
     
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  3. jimmy boogaloo

    jimmy boogaloo General Links/Your Account

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    what's the tl,dr version? are chokes bad? or ok?
     
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  4. Kneeblock

    Kneeblock Jumbo shrimp

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    I agree with the criticism of the study. A lot of variables haven't been appropriately accounted for. Still, the old "safer than boxing" shine MMA used to enjoy seems to be completely wearing off.
     
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  5. Ronnie Forney Nut Hugger

    Ronnie Forney Nut Hugger Fighting baked potato
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    This is common sense
     
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  6. Jesus X

    Jesus X my tools

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    you sound like a transient choker.
     
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  7. Ronnie Forney Nut Hugger

    Ronnie Forney Nut Hugger Fighting baked potato
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    That's a fair assessment.
    Every coach I've ever had calls me a choker.
     
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  8. Jesus X

    Jesus X my tools

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    not what I meant^^^
     
  9. Ronnie Forney Nut Hugger

    Ronnie Forney Nut Hugger Fighting baked potato
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    Oh, well I'm not homeless.
     
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  10. Hwoarang

    Hwoarang Well-Known Member

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    I think you lose consciousness as a protective mechanism to protect the brain, not because damage is being done like in head trauma. Thinking takes a lot of power, our brain weighs 2% of your body's mass but uses a massive 20% of the oxygen you breathe in. As it's running out of oxygen, you pass out so your brain stops all the voluntary functions and conserves what little oxygen it has for all the necessary involuntary functions.

    And if if we look to the old grapplers of the past, Gene Lebell, Helio and Carlos Gracie (and all their sons) etc: they would have all been choked an uncountable number of times, and it seems they all have normal brain function. I have never come across a pure grappler who has slurred speech or sounds remotely punch drunk like a lot of old boxer/kickboxers.
     
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  11. ENOCK

    ENOCK Underneath Denver International Airport

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  12. ErikMagraken

    ErikMagraken Well-Known Member

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    Good observations. A pure grappler study would be valuable. I understand there is one underway. Once the results are known I will write up an article discussing.
     
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  13. ErikMagraken

    ErikMagraken Well-Known Member

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    For those interested in this topic I shared this article, the study and its critique with the VP of the Association of Ringside Physicians. Here were his comments:

    Please let me read the full study and I will get back to you. However – off the bat a couple of things… 1) the events of what led to the choke is a very important thing to keep in mind. e.g.- Was there a concussive event prior causing impairment of the fighter and choke setup?

    2) Although KD testing IMO seems to be a nice screening tool it has not been tested enough to be truly validated. It has flaws – effort specifically. Also – concussion is a multifaceted injury and vision does not seem to be always impacted.

    After review I would tend to agree with @SamStellpflug critique. Authors definitely go out on a limb on statements about choke effects. What were the “events” that led to the choke? It’s a shame b/c I believe if they improved methods & cleaned up stats it could be a good study
     
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