Lifestyle Camping | First Aid | Backpacking |And other random bullshit....

Discussion in 'The Off-topic Lounge' started by ENOCK, Mar 25, 2020.

  1. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    EMP - Blackout - Lights out Jigga - on a Canopy my Stamina Be enough for Pamela Anderson Lee ...MTV Jam of the Week ....

    Cut/Copy/Paste Dump!




    Suggested Equipment List for Backpack Trips

    The following equipment list is a guide to help you prepare for backpack trips. More items are listed than you will actually need to give you an idea of some of the equipment possibilities.

    Dressing in layers is the best choice for outdoor activities. As you get warm you can take off layers, and as you cool down during breaks, you can put them back on. The term synthetics on the clothing lists, below, refers to materials such as pile, capilene, synchilla, lycra or polypropylene.

    Note also that some of the items can be shared. The tent and stove can be split up among the party. Repair and first aid kits can also be shared. Feel free to make copies of this list and pass it out to the members in your party.


    Clothing - Inner Layer
    Synthetic underwear
    Inner socks (wool or synthetic)
    Swim suit

    Clothing - Insulating Layer

    Pile shirts or jackets
    Down or synthetic fill jackets
    Down or synthetic fill vest
    Wool shirt
    Wool sweater
    Pants (preferably synthetic)
    Hiking shorts & t-shirt
    Wool or pile socks (2 pairs)
    Wool stocking hat
    If you expect cold weather: mittens or gloves (wool or pile)

    Clothing - Protective Layer

    Wind breaker or parka with hood
    Rain jacket or poncho
    Hat for sun protection

    Other Clothing Items
    Suspenders, belt or webbing
    Bandana
    Gaiters (if you'll be traveling through snow)

    Pants Pockets
    Matches (with striker in waterproof container)
    Knife
    Fire starter

    Feet

    Hiking boots
    Sandals or Tennis Shoes (nice in camp or for river crossings.)
    Insoles
    Extra socks

    Haulage

    Pack
    Stuff bags with toggles for clothing, food and gear
    Day pack (if you plan to do day hikes from a base camp)

    Bedroom
    Sleeping bag
    Sleeping pad
    Bivouac bag
    Tent (poles, snow stakes, fly, guy lines) OR Tarp and Groundcloth
    Candle or candle lantern

    Kitchen
    Stove
    Matches in stove
    Fuel bottle (with gas)
    Funnel
    Pots
    Pot gripper
    Cup
    Spoon
    Corkscrew
    Food
    Water container(s) & water
    Water purification system (filter & accessories, purification tablets)
    Bear-proof food container (in bear country)

    Repair Kit

    Sewing needle
    Nylon thread or dental floss
    Duct tape
    Vice grips (5" size)
    Clevis pins (for external frame packs)
    Bailing wire
    Extra stove parts (gaskets for stove, fuel cap, etc.)

    Emergency Kit
    Matches (and striker in waterproof container)
    Fire starter (solid fuel pellets, candle, pitch wood, etc.)
    Compass
    Map
    Knife
    Whistle
    Nylon cord

    First Aid Kit

    Two gauze rolls (2" wide)
    Moleskin for blisters
    Chapstick
    Sunblock
    Two triangular bandages
    Six sterile pads (4"x4")
    Anti-acid tablets
    Ace bandage
    Band aids-assorted sizes
    Butterfly closures
    Safety pins
    Aspirin
    Two-inch first aid tape
    First aid book
    Personal medications

    Personals

    Lotion
    Toothbrush/paste
    Glasses or contacts
    Comb
    Mirror

    Miscellaneous
    Sunglasses
    Sun block
    Headlamp or flashlight (spare batteries and bulb)
    Extra candles
    Rope (particularly important in bear country to hoist food into a tree)
    Watch
    Notebook/pencil
    Book
    Wire saw
    Thermometer
     
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  2. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Homemade Equipment
    (Camping)
    The original file for these low-cost equipment/ideas/fixes for Scouting and camping in general was originally found on a F-Net Scouting board and was reposted on Fidonet on Nov 11/92 by Steve Simmons. The file evidently originated with BSA Troop 886 in the USA.

    ------------------------------------------------------------


    Channel lock pliers make good pot holders.

    Make an oven by lining a moving box with aluminum foil and pushing coat hangers through both sides about half way up the box to form your grill.

    Put coals in a pan and put the pan on three stones on the bottom of the box. Close the doors (lid) and bake away.

    Canning rings can be use to cook your eggs in for egg sandwiches. (Works well for English Muffins or Hamburger buns).

    Nylon rope can be used as shoe laces.

    Use a large zip lock plastic bag, filled with air, as a pillow.

    Plastic butter tubs make good storage containers for your camp kitchen. (Not a good idea to use in a backpack).

    A plastic bottle makes a good latrine for cold weather camping. (You don't have to 'go' very far from your sleeping bag Keep it just out side the tent flap).

    An old closed cell foam exercise pad will make a passable sleeping pad.

    Plastic bottles can be used for canteens. Make sure the lid does not leak before using in a backpack.

    The pins which hold the backpack and shoulder straps to the frame can be replaced with a small piece of coat hanger threaded through the hole and twisted around itself.

    Twist ties can be used to hold up another tarp from your dining fly to form a wind screen.

    A small automotive water hose clamp can be used as a stop for your dining fly's upright poles.

    Drill a hole in the bottom of nested poles and put a screw in to stop inner poles from sliding out.

    Short lengths of coat hanger or wire can be thread through the holes and springs of the summer camp cots to replace the missing springs.

    Carry several pieces of lumber cut into 2 inch squares to summer camp and use these to level platform, tent and cot.

    If for health reasons you must sleep on a cot in cold weather insulate yourself from the cold air under the cot with several layers of newspaper.

    Old shower curtains make great ground clothes.

    Make a double boiler for melting paraffin from a 1 lb. coffee can and a 2 lb. coffee can. Bend a coat hanger so it will support the 1 lb. coffee can inside the 2 lb. can. Pour some water in the 2 lb. can and put the paraffin in the 1 lb. can.

    Waterproof matches by dipping in melted paraffin.

    Make fire starters by filling paper condiment cups with saw dust and pouring paraffin into the cup.

    Put matches in corrugated cardboard strips (about every other hole) and dip into paraffin for fire starters. Cut off what you need to start a fire.

    If your hand warmer came without a bag or the bag has been lost, replace the bag with a sock.

    A length of chain and a piece of coat hanger bent into an S-shape will allow you to hang your lantern from a tree limb.

    Use a cookie tin as a dutch oven.

    Keep batteries in an appropriate size prescription bottle to insure that they cannot run themselves down by accident.

    Prescription bottles make good match safes.

    Prescription bottles or 35mm file containers make good storage places for small items.


    Grills from old ovens can be used for fire grills, refrigerator shelves cannot be used as they will release toxic gasses when heated.

    A frisbee will add support to paper plates when the plate is place inside the frisbee.

    Make a camp washing machine from a five gallon bucket and a toilet plunger.

    Placing a plastic garbage bag over logs in a triangle will create a wash basin.

    Making a slit in a trash bag large enough to let your head through will make an emergency poncho.

    Laundry lint makes good tinder.

    Cutting slivers off scrap lumber and heating in the oven to dry out the wood will produce some very dry tinder. Remember to store in plastic bags for your next trip. Save candle stubs for fire starters or to use as paraffin to make other fire starters.

    Insulate your backpacking stove from the ground in cold weather with a 6" X 6" piece of plywood.

    Cover the ice in a picnic cooler with foil to help it last longer.

    Keep the water in your canteen cooler by wrapping the canteen in foil.

    Use foil ring dividers for frying eggs. Put rings in the greased pan and drop eggs into each ring.

    Find it hard to put patches on straight ? Tape them in place first with two-sided tape. When you are half-way done sewing, remove the tape.

    Save a handbook that's getting battered looking by putting on a transparent contact paper cover.

    Run candle stubs along the edge of a saw to help it glide better.

    When it comes time to pack up at the end of a camp, a wet toothbrush, face cloth and bar of soap wrapped in foil won't dampen the other things in your kit.

    To prevent night accidents in camp, use phosphorescent paint to mark the edges of latrines, the top of corner pegs of tents, etc.


    Before starting to sew a tough material like denim or canvas, stick the needle into a bar of soap. The coating will help the needle slide more easily through the fabric.

    To make sure you don't sew a pocket together while sewing a badge to the front, slip a jar lid, preferably plastic, into the pocket, then fearlessly sew away.

    To help shed burrs easily, rub the laces of your hiking boots with paraffin before hitting the trail.

    Keep a dry bar of soap in your sleeping bag to combat musty odors which develop during damp-season camping.

    Waxed milk cartons are an excellent source of emergency kindling. Cut cartons into slivers, wrap a bundle of them in plastic and carry them along in your pack.

    If a Scout has to take medicine, give him a break by letting him suck on an ice cube to numb his tongue before swallowing the vile stuff.

    Ice cubes are handy when you have to remove a splinter from a hand or foot. Use the ice to numb the area around the splinter before operating.

    Make your own insect-repelling candle from an ordinary thick candle.
    Drill a 1" deep hole near the wick, fill the whole with citronella and cover it with melted wax.

    When handling evergreens or pine cones, they can remove the sticky sap from their hands easily if they use baking soda instead of soap to wash.

    Water proof matches by dipping them in nail polish.

    To prevent batteries from wearing down if a flashlight is accidentally nudged on while you're traveling, put the flashlight batteries in backwards.

    Kitchen foil can add extra warmth to your boots. Trace each foot on a piece of foil and add a 5 cm border. Place the foil inside your boots, shiny side up so you benefit from radiant heat.

    The little plastic tags from bread and bun packages are great for pinning up wet bathing suits and towels at camp, and they take up a lot less packing space than clothespins.

    To protect your feet from blisters, smear soap on the inside of your inner sock at the heel and underneath the toes. Carry along a bar of soap and, when you feel your feet become tender, give it a try.

    Wear nylon footies next to your feet to help prevent blisters.

    To keep mosquitoes away rub the inside of an orange peel on face, arms and legs.

    Waxed-paper milk cartons have several lives left in them after the milk is gone:
    • make a drinking cup by cutting off the carton about three inches
      from the bottom.
    • make a water scoop by cutting off the top.
    • cut a container into slivers, wrap them in plastic and put them in
      your pocket for emergency kindling on a camping or hiking trip.
    • make a leak-proof mini-garbage can by opening up the top of
      the container and putting in your scraps.
    Discarded roll on deodorant bottles make an excellent insect repellent applicator because it enables you to keep 'bug dope' off your hands and out of your eyes. Snap off the plastic top or snap out the ball, rinse out the bottle and refill with your favorite liquid repellent.

    Make handy fire-starters by filling egg carton cups with lint from the dryer and pouring melted paraffin over the lint. Break the cup off to start each fire.

    Keep your toilet roll dry by packing it in a coffee tine with a snap-on lid.

    Remember that mosquitoes and biting flies seem to like dark colored clothing and the perfumed scents of many grooming products (soaps, shampoos, colognes, etc.) Dress so that you won't attract the biters, and try using unscented grooming aids.


    Certain fibers can be damaged by insect repellents. Don't apply repellents to spandex (from which bathing suits are made), rayon, or Dynel fabrics. Tent fabrics, plastic and painted surfaces also can be damaged by insect repellents.

    An insect repellant will not keep bees, wasps, or hornets from stinging you. Your wisest move is one away from stinging pests.

    Try using a 35mm film cannister when collecting insect specimens. A drop of alcohol makes the canister a fine killing jar. Label the cannister with tape and keep the specimen in it.

    It is easier to cut plastic containers if you soak them in very hot water immediately before cutting them.

    Wrap fishing gear in foil to keep line from tangling and hooks from rusting. By lining the compartments of a tackle box with foil, you can prevent rust damage to plugs and other equipment.

    Wrap a wet washcloth in a foil package and put it into your pack. You'll have a handy 'wet-wipe' for cleaning hands and face after a satisfying camp meal.

    Foil provides good packaging material for a campers personal toilet articles.

    Waterproof matches by dipping them in shellac.

    To remove musty smell from canteen, put three teaspoons of baking soda into the canteen with a bit of water. Swish it around and let sit for an hour, then rinse out the canteen.

    An empty plastic soda bottle, cut off to a convenient height, will work as a camp bowl. You may want to sandpaper the cut to smooth the edge.

    Make a survival fishing kit out of an empty 35mm film cannister. Wrap fishing line around a small empty thread spool. Tie the end to a fishhook, and place in the cannister. When ready to use, take the spool of line out. Lay the line across the opening of the cannister and snap the lid back on for use as a bobber.

    Make a fish scaler by nailing metal bottle caps to a wood block. Scrape against side of fish against direction of scales.




    to be continued.....
     
    #2 ENOCK, Mar 25, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  3. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    The Do-it-yourself Coffee Can Survival Kit

    This is a compact kit that can be carried in the car, on the boat, or in a pack for hunting, hiking, exploring, etc. Most of the contents will fit in a one-pound coffee can which doubles as a pot for melting snow and device with which to dig an emergency snow shelter. (However, if you can carry it, include a small shovel. It is far, far better than trying to use a coffee can.)

    Keep three points in mind when putting together a survival kit. First, make it small enough that you'll
    actually carry it and not leave it home. Second, use the list as a guide and customize it to your needs.

    For instance, if you are allergic to insect bites, bring the appropriate medicine, or carry appropriate wrap if you have knee problems.

    Thirdly, bring enough to enable you to spend at least one night out. It is usually the first 6 hours that
    determine whether you'll be able to survive an emergency.

    If you can make it through the first night, then your chances are good that you can make it a few more nights if necessary.

    Thanks to Allan Priddy who helps teach the Wilderness Survival class for putting this list together.




    General Items

    Braided nylon rope (25 feet)
    Mirror
    Matches (2 boxes)
    Fire Starter
    Poncho (bright orange to attract attention)
    Toilet paper
    Candle (wrapped in aluminum foil)
    Paper and pencil
    Fishing line, hooks, split shot leads
    Knife
    Whistle
    Money (2 nickels, 2 dimes, 2 quarters, $20 bill: helpful for making phone call or paying for gas if broken
    down along highway)
    Garbage Bags (2 large size bags)
    Bright orange surveyor's tape

    Repair Kit
    Sewing kit
    Dental floss (It's strong and useful as thread for sewing, or a fishing line or for lashing branches for
    improvised shelters.)
    Safety pins
    Wire (bailing wire)

    First Aid Kit
    Moleskin
    Sterile pads (2 x 2 and 4 x 4)
    Sterile Gauze
    Neosporin
    Bandaids
    Aspirin
    First Aid Tape

    Nourishment

    Honey Packages (available in small foil packages available at convenience stores)
    Instant Soup or tea (a couple packages)

    Optional
    Folding saw
    Compass (learn how to use)
    Hard Candy

    Carrying container
    Coffee Can (1 lb size) or nylon stuff bag

    All contents except the plastic bags and the optional items will fit in a 1 lb coffee can. (Or you can flat
    "Spam" cans or oval-shaped containers available at outdoor stores.) The plastic bags can be affixed to the outside of the can with a rubber band. To keep things from rattling in the can, wad up some wax paper and stuff it around the items. The wax paper stays dry and also doubles as a fire starter. To save weight the contents can be placed in a stuff bag and a metal cup can be used instead of the coffee can.
     
    #3 ENOCK, Mar 25, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  4. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Self Feeding Fire
    [​IMG]

     
    #4 ENOCK, Mar 25, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  5. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Wood Burning Campstove

    [​IMG]

    Freeze gallon jugs of water to keep food cold.

    [​IMG]



    Repurpose a coffee can to hold and protect TP.

    [​IMG]
     
    #5 ENOCK, Mar 25, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  6. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Head to your favorite picnic spot or campsite without spending hours packing up your kitchen. Stores campware, stove and other kitchen supplies and keeps them ready to go.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #6 ENOCK, Mar 25, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  7. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Practical Health Tips


    Water Purification

    Impure water is a common source of infection and disease. Seventy out of everyone hundred
    people in the world can only get impure water. Even when cities try to purify the water, the water
    can become impure in the water pipes or as it is brought to the home. Environmental conditions
    may also result in unexpected water contamination.

    Two easy ways to purify water in your home include:

    1. Add 4 drops of chlorine bleach to 1 liter of water. Bleach used for this purpose should contain 4-6 percent sodium hypochlorite.

    Sometimes you can only get bleach with 1 percent sodium hypochlorite. Then you must add twenty drops of bleach to a liter of water. Cover the container with a clean lid or cloth. Let the water stand for thirty minutes.

    If the water is cloudy, double the amount of chlorine bleach.

    Taste the water and notice the faint chlorine taste. If there is no chlorine taste, add two more drops of bleach. If the chlorine taste is too strong, pour the water back and forth from one clean container to another several times. This will improve the flavor. Some people are afraid that chlorine will hurt their bodies. In the amounts used to purify water, it is completely safe. Major cities throughout the world use chlorine to purify water.

    2. Water can also be purified by boiling it. To do this, bring it to a rolling boil, and let it continue to boil for two minutes. In many places in the world, the fuel-wood, gas, kerosene, etc. --for boiling water is much more expensive than the chlorine bleach to purify the same amount of water. However, if you have enough fuel or cannot get chlorine bleach, boiling may be the best way for you to purify water.

    NOTE:
    One way to make water clear and better tasting is to pour it through a water filter. However, filtering water will not destroy germs or parasite eggs. After water has been filtered, it still should be purified by using chlorine bleach or by boiling.



    Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water | US EPA
     
    #7 ENOCK, Mar 25, 2020
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
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  8. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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  9. sparkuri

    sparkuri Pulse On The Finger Of The Community
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    Swiss oven?
    I tried this camping.
    I imagine it works better with a bone-dry hardwood. Cedar gets outta control.
     
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  10. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Green Beret's Ultralight Bug Out Bag with Gear Recommendations
     
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  11. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Hand sanitizer

     
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  12. silentsinger

    silentsinger Ok Banger

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    @Hauler@Hauler
    We'll be asking questions after you've read the last posts.
     
  13. HEATH VON DOOM

    HEATH VON DOOM Remember the 5th of November

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    Jesus fucking christ, you may as well stay home if you need all that shit
     
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  14. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

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    Bottle of bourbon & a hammock.

    In wintertime, adjust to...
    Bottle of bourbon and a tent.

    ;)
     
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  15. silentsinger

    silentsinger Ok Banger

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    And a gert big bat.
    Are you saying you didn't read the aforementioned?
     
  16. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

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    Skimmed it. Why?
     
  17. BROVID-19

    BROVID-19 hörnchenmeister

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    I always like to think that the less gear, the more fun it will be in nature.
     
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  18. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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    Just trying to post useful content that may help fellow TMMAC members in these crazy days we are in.

    At this moment I'd like to apologize for any criticism directed at Sparkuri in regards to the COVID-19 Outbreak and to officially announce I have joined the:

    TEAM @sparkuri@sparkuri DOOMSDAY Prepping Caravan of Destruction!
     
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  19. conor mcgregor nut hugger

    conor mcgregor nut hugger Self-isolation helps flatten the curve

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    Download an app called Offline Survival Guide. It has everything from first aid to how to set traps.

    For catching lizards or snakes (you cannot be picky about food in a survival scenario, but make sure you cook what you catch), tie a snare knot and then tie the opposite end of the line/string to the end of a fishing pole or a long stick if you don't have a fishing pole.

    If you don't have string or line you can use tree/leaf vine.


    View: https://youtu.be/TAVloIuNlvE


    I have used this successfully. The lizards/snakes do not see the thin line/string as a threat, provided you don't get too close (you don't need a laser pointer but if you have one it helps with lizards to get them in the right position):


    View: https://youtu.be/5ngLQHvVGzA

    Try to get the snare loop as close to the end of the pole as possible, you don't want a lot of string hanging.

    Also, adjust your snare each time so that it is just big enough to get over the animal's head comfortably. Oversized loops lead to an increased chance of evasion by the animal.
     
    #19 conor mcgregor nut hugger, Mar 26, 2020 at 10:17 AM
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020 at 10:22 AM
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  20. sparkuri

    sparkuri Pulse On The Finger Of The Community
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    [​IMG]
     
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  21. ENOCK

    ENOCK (38.2839191, -80.3184308)

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