General Canadian Politics eh.

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MC Gusto

Freeloading Rusty
Jan 11, 2016
12,742
12,806
This may come as a shock to you, but some people would rather work manual labour than be an RCMP officer.
Not a shock at all.

But in most instances, a career as an RCMP officer will be much more lucrative than a job as a manual labourer (over double the yearly salary without factoring in pension, benefits and extra living expenses).

Point was, it is a good job for those with a lack of training or education.
 
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ConorMcGregorsBeard

Stewart Era Liberal
Jul 22, 2015
31,888
30,796
Not a shock at all.

But in most instances, a career as an RCMP officer will be much more lucrative than a job as a manual labourer (over double the yearly salary without factoring in pension, benefits and extra living expenses).

Point was, it is a good job for those with a lack of training or education.
There's much, much more to life than money.
 

ConorMcGregorsBeard

Stewart Era Liberal
Jul 22, 2015
31,888
30,796
Tell that to someone living in poverty and struggling with a lack of meaningful employment opportunities.
I wouldn't. I'd leave it up to the individual to decide how they feel about their situation and what their best course of action.

If they think being a laborer or unemployed is preferable to being an RCMP officer that's their prerogative.
 

DiSmAnTLeR

Well-Known Member
Apr 5, 2016
906
887
Labouring on a construction site with out the ability or means to complete trade school is not an effective way of obtaining an apprenticeship.

Point was, RCMP should be an attractive route to a well paying career for many without access to post secondary.

Best paying job anyone will find without post secondary, a trade or a specialized skill.

LOL. Now you have added a caveat (with out the ability or means to complete trade school) that was not discussed before. There are many government scholarships, loans, and grants available in order for a labourer to transition into a skilled tradesman. I know this because I received some of them myself. Many trade unions and private employers also offer grants and bursaries to provide the means.

I dropped out at 16 and worked as a construction labourer until I was accepted into an apprenticeship program for Sheet Metal. I cleared over $7000 a month last year working at Suncor’s Fort Hills Secondary Extraction Facility. Now I’m working on a degree in political science with the money that I saved.

I am a prime example of a construction labourer being a stepping stone to better things, but tell me more about how the trades work, Gusto! (Aren’t you a social worker?)
 

MC Gusto

Freeloading Rusty
Jan 11, 2016
12,742
12,806
Yes, because not wanting your family and friends to be potentially sexually assaulted makes you a white knight.
Its almost as if females dont experience sexual harassment as significant levels within the trades industries.

(You are a poor representative of the people that you claim to support.)
An appeal to emotions argumentum ad passiones.

I am disappointed in your lack of a quality response.

As well, I dont get it? Why would I represent the people I claim to support? And who do I claim to support? Why should I be a good representative of previously mentioned people?
 
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MC Gusto

Freeloading Rusty
Jan 11, 2016
12,742
12,806
LOL. Now you have added a caveat (with out the ability or means to complete trade school) that was not discussed before. There are many government scholarships, loans, and grants available in order for a labourer to transition into a skilled tradesman. I know this because I received some of them myself. Many trade unions and private employers also offer grants and bursaries to provide the means.

I dropped out at 16 and worked as a construction labourer until I was accepted into an apprenticeship program for Sheet Metal. I cleared over $7000 a month last year working at Suncor’s Fort Hills Secondary Extraction Facility. Now I’m working on a degree in political science with the money that I saved.

I am a prime example of a construction labourer being a stepping stone to better things, but tell me more about how the trades work, Gusto! (Aren’t you a social worker?)
A labourer doesn't make 7 grand per month.

A seasoned tradesman might, just like a seasoned RCMP officer would.

So you have been doing the same trade since you were 16 and pursued training to increase your earning potential... Shit, with that much training within and dedication to the RCMP, you could be clearing over a 100k per year.

Each is entitled to their own opinion. I just stated it was a good opportunity for those with a lack in post secondary educations as they didnt require years of apprenticing or post secondary educations.
 

MC Gusto

Freeloading Rusty
Jan 11, 2016
12,742
12,806
No one wants to get stationed in bumfuck no where, the prairies
This is true.

Definitely one of the aspects of the job that make it undesirable to many.

But the same can be said with most professional jobs. Most jobs with an actual designation, you have to earn your chops in less desirable communities before you can complete for the good jobs in the desirable cities.
 

MC Gusto

Freeloading Rusty
Jan 11, 2016
12,742
12,806
Many professions.

Living on the island, everyone who goes to school here wants to stay and practice in the field they were trained in yet most have to move away to secure that initial job within their profession (e.g. teachers, probation officers, social workers, lawyers and on and on it goes).

The trades and nursing seem to be about the only job you can get straight out of post secondary and secure a job within a desirable community on the island or lower mainland.
 

ConorMcGregorsBeard

Stewart Era Liberal
Jul 22, 2015
31,888
30,796
Many professions.

Living on the island, everyone who goes to school here wants to stay and practice in the field they were trained in yet most have to move away to secure that initial job within their profession (e.g. teachers, probation officers, social workers, lawyers and on and on it goes).

The trades and nursing seem to be about the only job you can get straight out of post secondary and secure a job within a desirable community on the island or lower mainland.
1) You and I have very different opinions on what makes a "professional job" 2) What's true where you live isn't true across the country. Here, none of the people you listed would have to move elsewhere for employment. Maybe probation officers, but I've never met one so I can't articulate their experience. Personally, I also wouldn't call that a professional job.
 

Lars

TMMAC Addict
Oct 17, 2015
19,318
27,690
This is true.

Definitely one of the aspects of the job that make it undesirable to many.

But the same can be said with most professional jobs. Most jobs with an actual designation, you have to earn your chops in less desirable communities before you can complete for the good jobs in the desirable cities.
I’ll write that down...
 

MC Gusto

Freeloading Rusty
Jan 11, 2016
12,742
12,806
1) You and I have very different opinions on what makes a "professional job" 2) What's true where you live isn't true across the country. Here, none of the people you listed would have to move elsewhere for employment. Maybe probation officers, but I've never met one so I can't articulate their experience. Personally, I also wouldn't call that a professional job.
Point # 1, any job in which one is specifically educated for, follows specific ethical guidelines and is a part of a registered board, association or oversight body is considered a profession.

How does your definition differ?

In reference to point #2, thats probably because Ottawa is not a desired place to live and work unless you are in govt.

Ottawa is a place you go to get experience so you can live in a desirable destination.
 
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ConorMcGregorsBeard

Stewart Era Liberal
Jul 22, 2015
31,888
30,796
Point # 1, any job in which one is specifically educated for, follows specific ethical guidelines and is a part of a registered board, association or oversight body is considered a profession.

How does your definition differ?
Back I'm the olden days of the late 90's and early 2000s your passport guarantor had to be a "professional" those positions were basically only ones that requires 2 or more levels of post secondary education. Doctor's, lawyer's, engineer's, etc. That to me is what makes a "professional occupation".

Point #2 is completely your opinion and although you're entitled to it you're only speaking based on your own life experience.
 

DiSmAnTLeR

Well-Known Member
Apr 5, 2016
906
887
What did you say?

Did you call him a big meanie?
From what I remember, I pointed out that I never claimed a labourer made $7000 a month and I added that anyone with 4 years in the industry and a Sheet Metal/insulation ticket did make that amount. I added that you did not need to be very skilled and referenced the fact that many people are simply ‘warm boots’ (they are time and material job$).

I also said something to the effect of him being a social worker trying to explain the trades to me. Of course, since I’m summarizing my own actions, I’m probably downplaying how much of a prick I was being!

I only noticed because it was double and triple posted, and I took the effort to edit out a wall of unnecessary text onto the thread!