Elliptical Machines?

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Combo

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2017
658
563
Anyone on here use them/rate them? Anyone not a fan of them? I like them, a lot.

Low impact, I find that they provide me with decent enough conditioning to get through various workouts, and don't leave me feeling thrashed or sore.
 

Pitbull9

Daddy
Jan 28, 2015
9,811
14,096
Anyone on here use them/rate them? Anyone not a fan of them? I like them, a lot.

Low impact, I find that they provide me with decent enough conditioning to get through various workouts, and don't leave me feeling thrashed or sore.
Depends on what you are using it for. For pure fat loss it rates about a D. I do like it for overall conditioning because you can go nuts on it, go forward or back, use arms and legs. For pure fat loss I like the step mill and high incline walking. Also HIIT on an empty stomach is great as well.
 

Combo

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2017
658
563
Depends on what you are using it for. For pure fat loss it rates about a D. I do like it for overall conditioning because you can go nuts on it, go forward or back, use arms and legs. For pure fat loss I like the step mill and high incline walking. Also HIIT on an empty stomach is great as well.
Oh, for fat loss it can work BUT you have to adjust the inclines etc every two minutes or so, and then you've gotta do it for 15 mins odd per set for it to work.

Yep, walking on an empty stomach would be better for fat loss. But I do like the Elliptical overall, though.
 

Pitbull9

Daddy
Jan 28, 2015
9,811
14,096
Oh, for fat loss it can work BUT you have to adjust the inclines etc every two minutes or so, and then you've gotta do it for 15 mins odd per set for it to work.

Yep, walking on an empty stomach would be better for fat loss. But I do like the Elliptical overall, though.
yeah you def need to rig that machine to really make it a good fat burner.
 

Tuc Ouiner

Posting Machine
May 19, 2016
1,390
1,188
I use my elip. mach. to travel the galaxy and burn fat in a low impact manner-- depends on my mood and if there is heavy ufo traffic or not-- just me.
 

Leigh

Engineer
Moderator
Pro Fighter
Jan 26, 2015
10,860
21,085
I'll preface by saying I find all cardio machines suck balls cos they're so monotonous, although I do have a spin bike I use when the weather is shit.

Can an elliptical get your heart rate where you want it? I struggle to get mine up on most machines. Low impact is a big bonus, agree.
 

nuraknu

savage
Jul 20, 2016
6,156
10,603
I'll preface by saying I find all cardio machines suck balls cos they're so monotonous, although I do have a spin bike I use when the weather is shit.

Can an elliptical get your heart rate where you want it? I struggle to get mine up on most machines. Low impact is a big bonus, agree.
I don't have trouble getting my heart rate up on an elliptical, since you can move your arms and legs at the same time and set the resistance, just like on a bike.

The new machines at my gym have these awesome hiking trails programmed. There's a big display and you choose the trail, like utah canyons, or a couple in new zealand, etc. There is a first person video of the trail that advances as you do. You set your base resistance and it automatically gets harder and easier based on where you are on the trail.
 

Leigh

Engineer
Moderator
Pro Fighter
Jan 26, 2015
10,860
21,085
I don't have trouble getting my heart rate up on an elliptical, since you can move your arms and legs at the same time and set the resistance, just like on a bike.

The new machines at my gym have these awesome hiking trails programmed. There's a big display and you choose the trail, like utah canyons, or a couple in new zealand, etc. There is a first person video of the trail that advances as you do. You set your base resistance and it automatically gets harder and easier based on where you are on the trail.
That sounds pretty cool.
 

Combo

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2017
658
563
I'll preface by saying I find all cardio machines suck balls cos they're so monotonous, although I do have a spin bike I use when the weather is shit.

Can an elliptical get your heart rate where you want it? I struggle to get mine up on most machines. Low impact is a big bonus, agree.
I have a love/hate relationship with them.

Hate using them, but absolutely LOVE the feeling I get (endorphin rush) from after I've finished.
 

GSPTrainingInAPool

Man on the silver mountain
Dec 1, 2015
2,995
3,825
Trying to get back in shape cardio wise. I've been doing 30 min elliptical. What i'll do is "jog" for about 10 minutes to warm up, then 10 minutes of
1)balls to the wall for 30 seconds
2)30 seconds recovery but faster than a jog
3)squat down and balls to the wall
4)30 seconds recovery and repeat that.
Then another 10 minutes of cool down. Not sure if it's working yet since I've only been doing it for a week!
 

vermonter

Active Member
May 15, 2015
186
220
If I use a machine, I use either a treadmill or an elliptical. I find that setting the elliptical on the lowest incline (no incline, not decline), low resistance and cruising at between 100 and 120 rpms (if memory serves) does a good job of mimicking jogging, which is the only kind of cardio I bother with. I don't use the arms. It's pretty easy using this method to remain in at a HR of 130-150 with a similar RPE to running, which is rare for any type of cardio.
 

Alexis Clifford

Ultimate Lurker
Feb 10, 2017
24
41
Anyone on here use them/rate them? Anyone not a fan of them? I like them, a lot.

Low impact, I find that they provide me with decent enough conditioning to get through various workouts, and don't leave me feeling thrashed or sore.
The biggest benefit of elliptical machines (vs other cardio machines) are they help with the upstroke of the leg movement which takes the pressure off your joints: knees, ankles, hips.

Those who want a harder workout don't usually use the elliptical, those who are looking at taking care of their joints in the long run love the elliptical.
 

Combo

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2017
658
563
The biggest benefit of elliptical machines (vs other cardio machines) are they help with the upstroke of the leg movement which takes the pressure off your joints: knees, ankles, hips.

Those who want a harder workout don't usually use the elliptical, those who are looking at taking care of their joints in the long run love the elliptical.
Yes. It's even more low impact than Swimming, IMHO.
 

Combo

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2017
658
563
Totally.

When I'm lazy at the gym, I jump on the elliptical machine.

If I'm lazy in the swimming pool, I drown.
I do honestly think that you can get a VERY good workout from an Elliptical IF you use it correctly.

Training on a Precor with both settings upwards of 10/10 for time (15 mins+) and keeping your stroke rate high will kick your butt.

I must use this machine 3-4 times a week, love it.
 

Alexis Clifford

Ultimate Lurker
Feb 10, 2017
24
41
I do honestly think that you can get a VERY good workout from an Elliptical IF you use it correctly.

Training on a Precor with both settings upwards of 10/10 for time (15 mins+) and keeping your stroke rate high will kick your butt.

I must use this machine 3-4 times a week, love it.
Yes, Combo, I agree with you. You CAN get a good workout from an elliptical machine if it's used appropriately. If you are on it at the maximum setting, I applaud you. You're getting in a kick ass work out (literally... it targets the glutes).

I, personally, am the type of person, who, if you give me a shortcut, I'll take it.

So the elliptical screams shortcut to me.

If I actually want to work out at the gym, I have to force myself to jump on the stair climber where I'll literally fall 2 feet to the ground if I slack off, or the treadmill which forces my posture to recruit more muscles so I have to work harder. Or, I need to get thrown in the ocean with swimming to shore as my only option home, otherwise...... the elliptical is right in front of 10 HD tvs, and I'm only human. :)
 

Combo

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2017
658
563
Yes, Combo, I agree with you. You CAN get a good workout from an elliptical machine if it's used appropriately. If you are on it at the maximum setting, I applaud you. You're getting in a kick ass work out (literally... it targets the glutes).

I, personally, am the type of person, who, if you give me a shortcut, I'll take it.

So the elliptical screams shortcut to me.

If I actually want to work out at the gym, I have to force myself to jump on the stair climber where I'll literally fall 2 feet to the ground if I slack off, or the treadmill which forces my posture to recruit more muscles so I have to work harder. Or, I need to get thrown in the ocean with swimming to shore as my only option home, otherwise...... the elliptical is right in front of 10 HD tvs, and I'm only human. :)
Haha! I see your point.

Man, my quads and flutes have been on F-I-R-E when I've had BOTH settings at 14/14 - and I only done 2 mins up there! Gasping for air, literally. Longest 2 mins ever! Lol.

But yeah, If I'm after a REALLY tough workout, I have to use the Rowing Machine instead.
 

Alexis Clifford

Ultimate Lurker
Feb 10, 2017
24
41
Haha! I see your point.

Man, my quads and flutes have been on F-I-R-E when I've had BOTH settings at 14/14 - and I only done 2 mins up there! Gasping for air, literally. Longest 2 mins ever! Lol.

But yeah, If I'm after a REALLY tough workout, I have to use the Rowing Machine instead.
See, you have way better mental focus than I do. The rowing machine is a seated machine. I'm even worse on the rowing machine than I am on an elliptical.

I guess the good news is if we are ever working out at the same gym, we will never fight over cardio machines.

And I definatly believe you about the fire---- your quads and glutes are literally going to be mistaken for rocks when strangers bump into you on the subway :)
 

Combo

Well-Known Member
Jan 22, 2017
658
563
See, you have way better mental focus than I do. The rowing machine is a seated machine. I'm even worse on the rowing machine than I am on an elliptical.

I guess the good news is if we are ever working out at the same gym, we will never fight over cardio machines.

And I definatly believe you about the fire---- your quads and glutes are literally going to be mistaken for rocks when strangers bump into you on the subway :)
Bro, I cannot STAND the Rower. But I do LOVE the fitness I can gain from it and the feeling I get from pushing through a tough session. Not many things touch it for mental and physical fitness AND strength.

Haha, I've literally had a PUMP in my quads from it. And the way it left me drained? Man, I thought I was SQUATTING! Haha.
 

Alexis Clifford

Ultimate Lurker
Feb 10, 2017
24
41
Bro.... lol.

I'm a female. That's me in my profile picture.

If the rower is something that challenges YOU---- can you imagine how much I dislike the rower? My upper body strength is obviously way lower than yours..... I'd rather walk through fire than use the rower.

I'm glad the elliptical pumps your quads! I guess there is a purpose to those machines afterall :p
 

vermonter

Active Member
May 15, 2015
186
220
The biggest benefit of elliptical machines (vs other cardio machines) are they help with the upstroke of the leg movement which takes the pressure off your joints: knees, ankles, hips.

Those who want a harder workout don't usually use the elliptical, those who are looking at taking care of their joints in the long run love the elliptical.
The upstroke of non-elliptical leg movements puts pressure on your joints?
 

Alexis Clifford

Ultimate Lurker
Feb 10, 2017
24
41
The upstroke of non-elliptical leg movements puts pressure on your joints?
Hey Vermonter! I guess it does sound funny when I phrase it like that. I should clarify, the upstroke of the elliptical causes less force of impact when the foot reaches the lowest level of stride. On a tredmill for instance, when your foot hits the belt, there is very little give from the conveyer belt. As a result of lack of "absorption of shock", the force of impact shoots vertically, directly back up through your foot, to your ankle, knee and hip. Your joints become shock absorbers.

Imagine if you were driving on the highway at 60 miles an hour, and you drive straight into a non-moving wall. The impact would be deadly.

However, if you driving on the same highway at 60 miles an hour, and you drive into the car ahead of you which was moving at 30 miles an hour, the impact is much less because there is give from the other car. The car going at 30 mph was able to absorb some of the force from the impact, therefore making the damage to your car less than it would have been if you drove into the wall.

Likewise, the elliptical trainer "gives" a lot at the point where your foot would hit the bottom of the stride, so the force is much less of an impact on your joints.

I was kind of joking with Combo above about my laziness on the elliptical, but the truth is, I use the elliptical every time I can. When I get bored I use the bike, also low impact on my joints and when I finally get REALLY bored, I use other machines like the stair climber and treadmill, but I use them very sparingly.

Even though the stairclimber and treadmill burn more calories, I personally have always valued my joint health over a few measly calories per workout. And like Combo mentioned, when I turn up the levels on the elliptical, I get as much of a burn on my quads, hamstrings or glutes depending on what setting I put it on. Hope that helped clear up any confusion I may have caused earlier!
 

vermonter

Active Member
May 15, 2015
186
220
Hey Vermonter! I guess it does sound funny when I phrase it like that. I should clarify, the upstroke of the elliptical causes less force of impact when the foot reaches the lowest level of stride. On a tredmill for instance, when your foot hits the belt, there is very little give from the conveyer belt. As a result of lack of "absorption of shock", the force of impact shoots vertically, directly back up through your foot, to your ankle, knee and hip. Your joints become shock absorbers.

Imagine if you were driving on the highway at 60 miles an hour, and you drive straight into a non-moving wall. The impact would be deadly.

However, if you driving on the same highway at 60 miles an hour, and you drive into the car ahead of you which was moving at 30 miles an hour, the impact is much less because there is give from the other car. The car going at 30 mph was able to absorb some of the force from the impact, therefore making the damage to your car less than it would have been if you drove into the wall.

Likewise, the elliptical trainer "gives" a lot at the point where your foot would hit the bottom of the stride, so the force is much less of an impact on your joints.

I was kind of joking with Combo above about my laziness on the elliptical, but the truth is, I use the elliptical every time I can. When I get bored I use the bike, also low impact on my joints and when I finally get REALLY bored, I use other machines like the stair climber and treadmill, but I use them very sparingly.

Even though the stairclimber and treadmill burn more calories, I personally have always valued my joint health over a few measly calories per workout. And like Combo mentioned, when I turn up the levels on the elliptical, I get as much of a burn on my quads, hamstrings or glutes depending on what setting I put it on. Hope that helped clear up any confusion I may have caused earlier!
So it might be more accurate to say that an elliptical has less impact on the downstroke, instead of less pressure on the upstroke, no? ;)

In actuality, an elliptical has more "pressure" at the end of the upstroke and all through the the downstroke in the form of shearing forces, which is why it's contraindicated for some injuries.

Also, as a woman especially, you'd be wise to invest in impact generating exercise anyway. Your joints will be fine unless you're already injured.
 

Alexis Clifford

Ultimate Lurker
Feb 10, 2017
24
41
So it might be more accurate to say that an elliptical has less impact on the downstroke, instead of less pressure on the upstroke, no? ;)

In actuality, an elliptical has more "pressure" at the end of the upstroke and all through the the downstroke in the form of shearing forces, which is why it's contraindicated for some injuries.

Also, as a woman especially, you'd be wise to invest in impact generating exercise anyway. Your joints will be fine unless you're already injured.

Thanks for responding Vermonter! I have to run out to grab coffee with a friend right now---- which also gives me a great excuse to get some caffine, and have more time to logically work through your points and determine if I agree or disagree with what you wrote before I respond. I'll be back!
 

Alexis Clifford

Ultimate Lurker
Feb 10, 2017
24
41
So it might be more accurate to say that an elliptical has less impact on the downstroke, instead of less pressure on the upstroke, no? ;)

In actuality, an elliptical has more "pressure" at the end of the upstroke and all through the the downstroke in the form of shearing forces, which is why it's contraindicated for some injuries.

Also, as a woman especially, you'd be wise to invest in impact generating exercise anyway. Your joints will be fine unless you're already injured.

Yes, you're right about it's more accurate to say an elliptical has less impact on the downstroke, not the upstroke. :)

Yes, you're right about the elliptical has more "pressure" at the end of the upstroke and all through the downstroke due to shearing stress. My mistake!

However, why do you recommend adding impact to joints as a woman especially? Studies show women tend to experience greater muscle and joint pain in general than men.