Monkey Shoulder - Scotch

Discussion in 'The Off-topic Lounge' started by Hauler, Mar 11, 2016.

  1. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    Just giving you guys a tip here. I like Scotch. Scotchy stotch scotch. And because of this I know it's easy to spend a TON of money on scotch.

    If you are wanting to try some scotch but don't want to spend a shit ton of money.....Get some Monkey Shoulder.

    [​IMG]
    Yeah, It's a blend. But it's really, really good. Not peaty at all so it's a nice introduction to the spirit. But it's good - even the finest scotch lovers will appreciate the smoothness of Monkey Shoulder - providing they aren't pretentious assholes, which in case you probably shouldn't be hanging with them anyway.

    And the best part is you should be able to pick up a bottle for under $30.
     
    • Informative Informative x 5
    • Winner Winner x 2
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. Lamont Cranston

    Lamont Cranston Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?
    First 100

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2015
    Messages:
    2,177
    Ratings:
    +2,935
    Niiice....
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  3. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    Dougie - I laugh everytime I see your picture. I love me some Beaker.
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  4. RaginCajun

    RaginCajun Undefeated in i don't know what

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2015
    Messages:
    14,657
    Ratings:
    +37,892
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  5. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    It's just a public announcement. If you want some - this is a safe play
     
  6. Kiwi

    Kiwi Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2015
    Messages:
    79
    Ratings:
    +196
    @Alco Hauler@Alco Hauler knows his shit.

    I too am a Scotch drinker and wholeheartedly reccommend Monkey Shoulder.

    Yes, it is a blend, so supposedly not on a par with a single malt but heres the thing:

    The Monkey Shoulder blend is three single malts from the same region - Glenfiddich, Balvenie, and Kininvie.

    It is exceptional - especially considering the price - and a fucking great way to start with Scotch without breaking the bank.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. Lord Vutulaki

    Lord Vutulaki Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2015
    Messages:
    16,659
    Ratings:
    +6,222
    I wish I could handle my alcohol but I cant but here's to living vicariously through yous;


    The Home of malts

    Greatness doesn't come easy. That's why Scottish Whisky makers have to adhere to strict guidelines for their product to be classed as Scotch. It has to be produced entirely in Scotland, contain no added substances (except for water and caramel), be aged at least three years and bottled with a ABV of at least 40%


    It's not suprising the Scots place such standards on how modern Scotch is made - they have quite a reputation to uphold. The drink's origins lie back in the fourth or fifth century, when Christian monks introduced distillation to the Scottish Isles. Originally, the practice was used for making perfume and wine, but was adapted for grain and cereal mashes - paving the way for the first Whiskies. Early on, these spirits were used for medicinal purposes (some even claimed to cure smallpox!) and given the Gaelic term uisce breatha (or 'water of life')

    • At a glance:
    • Historic
    • Complex
    • Versatile
    • Regional
    Scottish Whisky production slowly grew through the centuries, until it was harshly taxed in 1644. Not suprisingly, the feisty Scots didn't take well to this. Whisky production went underground, and in 1780, it was estimated that the nation was home to eight legal distilleries and over 400 illegal ones! Luckily, in the 19th century the taxman finally relaxed a little, allowing Scotch to (legally) grow into the world's favourite Whisky.

    SCOTCH WHISKY EXPLAINED
    Different years in wood (from no age statement to 25 years plus); different cask woods & finishes (sherry, Bourbon, port); varying peat levels (light to peaty monsters), and proof levels (40% to cask strength, usually around 57% ABV) to even specific barley varieties (bere, golden promise to organic). Never in the history of whisky has there been such an enormous range and high quality products to choose from.


    Each malt distillery tends to have its historical house style from the heavily peated style of Laphroaig on Islay toAuchentoshan's triple distilled lighter Lowland Whisky. Many variables influence the flavour including malting, fermentation regimes, still design, condenser to wood policy. These hundred odd malt distilleries and their different wood programs can formulate an endless range of malts and blended Whisky.

    SCOTCH WHISKY REGIONS
    When blended Whisky dominated sales from the second half of the 19th century Scotland was divided into geographic regions to aggregate malt distilleries and their Whiskies into production districts. Historically, some distillers produced flavour styles shaped by their isolation and natural resources. For example Islay used local ground peat to cure their malted barley giving Islay Whisky its distinctive smoky or phenolic taste.

    It's Scotland's topography which defines Whisky regions and cumulates malt distilleries into the following five geographic indicators.




    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    When it comes to variety, Speyside's got the rest of Scotland beat. Whiskies from this region can range from light and grassy, all the way up to rich and sweet. They're easy to enjoy, yet also complex, making them perfect for both Whisky newcomers, as well as seasoned experts.


    Speyside's broad range of flavours is thanks to the large number of distilleries within its boarders. In fact, while Speyside is geographically a part of the Highlands its sheer number of distilleries means it's classed as its own region. Today, Speyside is home to more than 60 distilleries - that's over 50% of Scotland's overall number - all scattered across its rich vistas.


    So, what makes this relatively small region of Scotland so popular? It's that vital Whisky ingredient that we know as water. The River Spey, Scotland's second largest river, flows through the region, supplying water to many distilleries - including Glenfiddich and Glenlivet, makers of the world's most famous (and most popular) Single Malt Scotch Whiskies.


    Glenfiddich and Glenlivet are also prime examples of an unusual Speyside naming quirk: over a dozen distilleries in this region begin with 'Glen'. The reason for this? When building a distillery, Whisky-makers would look for a location that had a plentiful supply of water, ideally a river. This was often found in a valley, and the Gaelic word for 'valley'? That would be 'Glen'.


    But it doesn't matter what language you're speaking, or how advanced you are in you Whisky journey, a Whisky from Speyside os a treat for everyone.
    [​IMG]
    Covering the top two-thirds of the mainland, the Highlands in Scotland's largest Whisky region. With this ample space, the distilleries have room to spread out, meaning that the Highland's Whiskies often have highly individual flavours and ingredients.


    In the North, many distilleries are situated by the seaside. This means big, peaty flavours, but still a nice twist of complexity. Down south and to the east, you're more likely to find medium to full-bodied Scotch that's smooth and sweet, while out west is home to light-bodied expressions, as well as peaty, powerful Single Malts.


    For the answer as to why exactly there's a Whisky divide between the Highlands and the Lowlands, we have to go back to the 18th century. That's when the Highland line, which divides the two regions, was used for the purpose of introducing two different sets of taxes and regulations on spirit production. The Highland distilleries were taxed less than their Lowland counterparts, with the idea being that it would help encourage illegal distilleries to become legal ones. The tax incentive meant Highland distilleries were able to create higher-quality Whisky than their Lowland dwelling counterparts.


    The only catch to this? In 1785, after Lowland Whisky-makers kicked up a stink (which, in fairness, they were probably entitled to do), the government enacted a new law. They decreed that the top-notch Whisky from the Highlands was, rather cruelly, banned from being exported out of the region.


    Although, with the Scottish and their proud history of smuggling, you can guess how successful this ban actually was.
    [​IMG]
    Although it's Scotland's second largest region, right after the Highlands, today the Lowlands only has four active distilleries: Alisa Bay, Auchentoshan, Bladnoch and Glenkinchie. All these distilleries offer a more gentle version of Scotch, ideal for Whisky newcomers.


    The reason for their fairer flavours? While some other regions might be boarderline-obsessed with peat(Islay, we're looking in your direction!) the Lowland Whiskies ise almost none. This, along with their inland location - away from all the salt-imbued air - help keep the big and bold tastes to a minimum. However, the biggest factor comes not from ingredients and location, but from method. Many Lowland Whiskies are triple distilled (most other Scotch is double distilled), the extra attention giving them a more inviting taste. While this practice is hardly unheard of in other regions, it's a trademark of the Lowlands.


    Back in the 19th century, the Lowlands was one of Scotland's major producers of legally made Whisky, with over 180 distilleries peppering the region. At one point, they were distilling at such a rate that they began selling surplus Whisky to Gin producers, who redistilled it for use in their product. Things became tougher, as taxes and bizarre laws made things hard for Lowland distillers to stay open. In the late 20th century, Lowland Whisky was almost wiped out totally, with eight Lowland distilleries closing between 1975 and 1995 alone. But thanks to a newfound popularity, today it seems these lasses still have their best years ahead.
    [​IMG]
    Islay's (pronounced I-la) Whiskies are bold, brash and pack a punch you won't find anywhere else.


    When describing the flavours of these Whiskies, critics use words like iodine, salt, smoke, seaweed and medicinal (yes, really). While these might scare off a novice, they're music to the ears of those with an experienced palate - or folks who don't mind a challange!


    Islay Whiskies owe their distinctive flavour to a combination of location, ingredients and local expertise. It all begins in Islay's swamps, bogs and wetlands. That's where you'll find peat, a type of partially decayed vegetaion that helps give Islay Whiskies their distinct taste. While sitting in the wetlands, the peat is imbued with the notes of the sea, thanks to the powerful Atlantic winds that thump the island. This ocean-powered peat is harvested by the island's distilleries, who burn it to dry the malted barley used in their Whiskies.


    The result is Whisky that's intensely smoky, powerful and not for the faint of heart. This is where distilleries like Ardbeg and Laphroaig - who seem to revel in challenging taste buds as much as delighting them - excel. If that sounds a bit off-putting, don't worry. There are also distilleries like Bruichladdich who, while still drawing on the power of peat, create a milder, less palate-pounding version of Islay Whisky.


    Ultimately, it doesn't matter whether you're new to Whisky and want a challenge, or an old hand used to what the island offers, you'll experience flavours that are as intense as they are unique.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
  8. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    Just cracked this bottle open. Might get a fire going on the back deck and chill out for the night.

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 2
  9. Left Hook Larry

    Left Hook Larry 3x Undisputed Monsters Champ/King of Buttertooths
    First 100

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2015
    Messages:
    12,586
    Ratings:
    +19,741
    living up to your name here. well done lad
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  10. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    I'm going to pick up a bottle next time I see it. I'm more of a bourbon drinker, but have been getting into scotch more and more over the last few years.
     
  11. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    Love me some Bourbon.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    I'm about to hit the Buffalo Trace
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  13. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    I hit winner. But I didn't feel that was enough.

    So......

    FUCKING WINNER

    Good stuff.
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  14. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    I'm a big fan of Buffalo Trace products, and wheated bourbons in general. One of their head distillers was in Austin last week for some event at one of the local liquor stores. Allegedly if you went you could enter a raffle to buy some of their rare bottles. But I missed it because I've been on vacation (god damn it).


    [​IMG]
    For the price, this a great bourbon. I keep it on hand always and it has become my "house bourbon".
     
    • Winner Winner x 2
  15. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    I can usually find that one^^^, but other Buffalo products have been getting more and more scarce the past few years.

    Just yesterday a buddy found me 2 bottles of the W.L Weller 12-year (one of my favorites). I haven't been able to find it locally in over two years. Damn hipsters getting in on my bourbon action...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    Me and my family are on our way back to Texas from Arizona, and in AZ they had this one^^^ in the Frys grocery store. Mind was blown - I'm not used to seeing liquor in grocery stores, and they actually had some good whisky. And, they have a bar in the grocery store with draft beer and cocktails. How fucking cool is that?! But alas, I'm sitting in a hotel room in Las Cruces NM with my Buffalo :)
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  17. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    Some of the grocery stores here are adding craft beer sampling. It's basically a bar for dudes to sit at while their wives shop.

    Hint : Buy KR stock. Haha
     
    • Like Like x 1
  18. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    Exactly. And I love it. My wife said it's a better system because she knew exactly where I'd be when she was done hah
     
  19. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    Your wife is wise.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  20. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    She was a good catch ;)

    Cheers brother
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  21. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    Giving this a try tonight. Let's get this party started.
    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  22. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    You will not be disappointed.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  23. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    It's pretty good man, very easy to drink. Thanks for the recommendation!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  24. Grateful Dude

    Grateful Dude Posting Machine

    Joined:
    May 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,090
    Ratings:
    +8,099
    Grabbed another bottle of Monkey today for a pool party/BBQ. This shit just goes down smooth. Finished the bottle between 3 of us, so now that I'm back home I guess I'm back to bourbon for the next round.

    #WHISKEYPOWER
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  25. Hauler

    Hauler Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2016
    Messages:
    22,751
    Ratings:
    +35,160
    Tried a new one last night. Bought a bottle of Tomatin 12 yr. Bourbon and Sherry Cask. I had honestly never heard of this Scotch before.

    It caught my eye because it was a Single Malt priced under $30 (I think I paid $27), which is practically unheard of anymore.

    It's quite good. Sweet. Smooth. It's also very light on the peat if that's not your thing. Thumbs up!

    [​IMG]
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
Draft saved Draft deleted