Sci/Tech Purdue Pharma pleads guilty

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ThatOneDude

Commander in @Chief, Dick Army
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Jan 14, 2015
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Hauler

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Feb 3, 2016
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$8 billion?

Holy shit!

Lawyers getting all that or does it go to the families?
 

ThatOneDude

Commander in @Chief, Dick Army
First 100
Jan 14, 2015
27,412
28,162
$8 billion?

Holy shit!

Lawyers getting all that or does it go to the families?
From the sound of it people expect it to never be paid and are upset the family who owned the company will not be going to jail as of right now.
 

Hauler

Unknown Member
Feb 3, 2016
28,336
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From the sound of it people expect it to never be paid and are upset the family who owned the company will not be going to jail as of right now.
Is it their fault their drug was handed out by "doctors" indiscriminately?

I haven't looked into any of this, but it feels a bit like a fat fuck suing McDonalds.
 

ThatOneDude

Commander in @Chief, Dick Army
First 100
Jan 14, 2015
27,412
28,162
Is it their fault their drug was handed out by "doctors" indiscriminately?

I haven't looked into any of this, but it feels a bit like a fat fuck suing McDonalds.
They were actively giving doctors kick backs for prescribing more opiates. That's an issue in the medical world over all, but especially in this case.
 

RaginCajun

And knowing is half the battle
Oct 25, 2015
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From the sound of it people expect it to never be paid and are upset the family who owned the company will not be going to jail as of right now.
Even if the sackler family does pay all the money owed, they still get to keep billions more. According to google they are worth $13billion.
 

Hauler

Unknown Member
Feb 3, 2016
28,336
39,069
They were actively giving doctors kick backs for prescribing more opiates. That's an issue in the medical world over all, but especially in this case.
That is standard operating procedure in big pharma, bro.
 

Filthy

ZBM2
Jun 28, 2016
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Hauler @Hauler

"CONTROLLED DRUGS, WITH their potential for abuse and diversion, can pose public health risks that are different from—and more problematic than—those of uncontrolled drugs when they are overpromoted and highly prescribed. An in-depth analysis of the promotion and marketing of OxyContin (Purdue Pharma, Stamford, CT), a sustained-release oxycodone preparation, illustrates some of the key issues. When Purdue Pharma introduced OxyContin in 1996, it was aggressively marketed and highly promoted. Sales grew from $48 million in 1996 to almost $1.1 billion in 2000.1 The high availability of OxyContin correlated with increased abuse, diversion, and addiction, and by 2004 OxyContin had become a leading drug of abuse in the United States.2

Under current regulations, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is limited in its oversight of the marketing and promotion of controlled drugs. However, fundamental changes in the promotion and marketing of controlled drugs by the pharmaceutical industry, and an enhanced capacity of the FDA to regulate and monitor such promotion, can positively affect public health.

OxyContin's commercial success did not depend on the merits of the drug compared with other available opioid preparations. The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics concluded in 2001 that oxycodone offered no advantage over appropriate doses of other potent opioids.3 Randomized double-blind studies comparing OxyContin given every 12 hours with immediate-release oxycodone given 4 times daily showed comparable efficacy and safety for use with chronic back pain4 and cancer-related pain.5,6 Randomized double-blind studies that compared OxyContin with controlled-release morphine for cancer-related pain also found comparable efficacy and safety.79 The FDA's medical review officer, in evaluating the efficacy of OxyContin in Purdue's 1995 new drug application, concluded that OxyContin had not been shown to have a significant advantage over conventional, immediate-release oxycodone taken 4 times daily other than a reduction in frequency of dosing.10 In a review of the medical literature, Chou et al. made similar conclusions.11

The promotion and marketing of OxyContin occurred during a recent trend in the liberalization of the use of opioids in the treatment of pain, particularly for chronic non–cancer-related pain. Purdue pursued an “aggressive” campaign to promote the use of opioids in general and OxyContin in particular.1,1217 In 2001 alone, the company spent $200 million18 in an array of approaches to market and promote OxyContin."