Society Sensitivity and privilege

Discussion in 'The Off-topic Lounge' started by Kneeblock, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. Kneeblock

    Kneeblock Jumbo shrimp

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    I've been thinking a lot about these two concepts. I feel like there are no two words that are more alienating in modern discourse.

    Calling someone "over-sensitive" or "too sensitive" is like a death sentence in some spaces online, but similarly in interpersonal conversation there is probably nothing you can do to rile someone up like calling them oversensitive. What the word tries to allude to is the gulf between someone's reaction and someone's intent, but both of those are in the brain and speakers and listeners have no way of really knowing what's in someone's brain. There needs to be a word like sensitive without the alienating connotations, which usually suggest being out of control, are often feminized, and serve as a way of invalidating how someone is feeling. Analogous words include triggered, etc.

    Privilege has a similar effect, mostly due to long simmering class tensions around the world. No one wants to believe that they're privileged because it suggests they didn't earn something or that someone else's sacrifices and disadvantages make them somehow nobler than someone who didn't have those disadvantages. There are many places where simply using the world privilege will lead to a total shutdown in the conversation. But the word is accurate, at least, as it nods to real material disparities that exist in the world and at least to the consequences of a few symbolic ones. Analogous words include entitled etc.

    My question is what words could replace these highly charged words in discourse? Is there even a need for them? What do these words make you feel when you hear them about someone else? What do they make you feel when one or the other is applied to you?

    FULL DISCLOSURE: Normally I don't do any research on this forum because I don't crap where I eat, but I may end up writing about this topic at some point.
     
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  2. Filthy

    Filthy Too dumb to win, too tough to Ignore

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    words don't have magical powers, the problem will persist even if you change the name.

    crippled people didn't start walking when we started calling them handicapped, and retards still can't do math.
     
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  3. Kneeblock

    Kneeblock Jumbo shrimp

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    Fair point, but the goal of word choice isn't to alter physical reality. It's to communicate more clearly.
     
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  4. Jdog93

    Jdog93 Grrrrrrrr..

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    Too many big words in this Thread.. And for that reason.

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. yuki2054

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    The words snowflake for one. And Prince for two. Spring to mind...
     
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  6. Filthy

    Filthy Too dumb to win, too tough to Ignore

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    I appreciate that you're looking for a solution, but I struggle with the underlying conflicts of identity politics and class identity. I think that the efforts to quantify privilege are doomed because they're focusing on the wrong metric - namely superficial differences in appearance or lifestyle choices.
     
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  7. ENOCK

    ENOCK Underneath Denver International Airport

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    “Over-Sensitive” I would replace with “Pussy”
    “Too Sensitive” I would simply replace with “Big Pussy”

    I Believe that is the direction we need to go with the pussification of America.
     
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  8. Kneeblock

    Kneeblock Jumbo shrimp

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    FRAT version:

    People don't like being called too sensitive or privileged. What are some words that accomplish the same goals, but provoke people less?
     
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  9. IschKabibble

    IschKabibble Posting Machine
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  10. Filthy

    Filthy Too dumb to win, too tough to Ignore

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    i miss George.
     
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  11. Toelocku

    Toelocku Nationalist Populist

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    Sensitive Sally's
     
  12. Jdog93

    Jdog93 Grrrrrrrr..

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    Being called a Bad Boy...:(
     
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  13. blank

    blank Posting Machine

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    Clear communication takes patience and doesn't assume too much. The problem is not the words but in us imo.
     
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  14. Sex Chicken

    Sex Chicken Completely Shirtless

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    I think of privilege as a “blind spot”. An example is when the Louis CK stuff and his subsequent apology came out. I thought he was out of line, but I didn’t really get it. I read his apology and thought he handled it well and there was no real harm done. Then I was talking to my friend’s wife and found out she was disgusted by the apology. After she explained it from her perspective, I saw how his behaviour and his apology was viewed by a lot of women and understood the outrage a little better.

    I think the problem is in people’s ego and arrogance thinking they can see an issue objectively without ever having the issue affect them.

    Same thing with trans-gender, LGBQT, and race issues. I can do my best, but I’m always going to have a blind spot, some people would object to saying my blind spots are called by the privilege of being a white straight male (great head of hair, ko power on both hands, wonderful dancer), if you don’t like privilege just think of it as the understanding you can’t have without experiencing something someone else has to struggle against.

    If you want to hear more of my ideas, check out my podcast Get Woke Cucktard! available on Stitcher, ITunes , or wherever you get your podcasts.
     
    #14 Sex Chicken, Jun 6, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2019
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  15. Sloppy Bitch

    Sloppy Bitch I love drama

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    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Sex Chicken

    Sex Chicken Completely Shirtless

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    I bet if you and I were to sit down and have an open and honest conversation, you could open my eyes to some of the issues facing the micro penis’d communitty.
     
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  17. Never_Rolled

    Never_Rolled Dad motherfucker of the planet

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    My white privilege believes I to be a better dancer. You don’t want no part of my Macarana (sp)
     
  18. BirdWatcher

    BirdWatcher Fully charged
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    [​IMG]
     
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  19. ConorMcGregorsBeard

    ConorMcGregorsBeard The Face That Runs the Place

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    It's not the words, the concepts themselves are problematic. They're both generally terms used, and concepts held by people who lack empathy. Changing the word, won't change the derogatory nature of the person using it.
     
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  20. Kneeblock

    Kneeblock Jumbo shrimp

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    So what is it that you find problematic about each concept? How is it that they convey a lack of empathy? What would be an alternate frame that wasn't derogatory?
     
  21. ConorMcGregorsBeard

    ConorMcGregorsBeard The Face That Runs the Place

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    To be succinct; "You're too sensitive" shouldn't require explanation. It's really easy to tell someone that until you find out the conditions that they experienced which have lead them to hold the view they do.

    "Privilege" is an issue because the people who use it generally have a hierarchy of what they consider to be advantages in life. Whether those advantages actually apply to an individual are irrelevant in their application.

    It's difficult to put into words without making an extremely long post, so if I may I'm going to make a couple analogies that I think might better illustrate my point.

    I've been told before "Male privilege is being able to walk alone at night and not fear for your safety." I don't know what neighborhood these people grew up in but where I came from, not only was a male way more likely to be assaulted, but you can bet your sweet ass that you didn't walk through the park at night without being attentive of your surroundings.

    I've been told "Your ancestors didn't come to this continent as slaves." They apparently didn't get the note about new immigrants being shoved into internment camps during World War II and then forced to live in the shittiest neighborhoods in the city and take the jobs the people who were already here refused to do because they were hard work and shitty pay.

    Conversely, the exact opposite things can be said when people go the "you're too sensitive" root. In either case, it illustrates a lack of empathy toward someone else's life experiences. The alternate frame would be to judge people on the content of their character, but it seems like people are more interested in making flash assessments.
     
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  22. Kneeblock

    Kneeblock Jumbo shrimp

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    I think you bring up the crux of why they're such charged terms. I guess the question is that there are times when social forces seem to collide with individual behaviors. In other words, there are things people say and do that are socially constructed. Typically, when someone uses the term "privilege," they're trying to point out this interaction between historical social forces and daily life. These often fall along identity lines even though the word is more associated with class divisions. When people use the term "oversensitive" they are similarly pointing to social forces. The implication is that 1) Society itself requires more resiliency than the person interpreting (the interpretant) is exhibiting; 2) the interpretant may have their own set of privileges they are not recognizing or downplaying, and/or 3) the interpretant is applying a social lens to a comment or idea that the speaker feels isn't relevant to the situation.

    So when we say judge someone on the content of their character, for instance, there are a number of questions about what standards of judging, what comprises "good" and "bad" content and whether the assemblage of all of it can reliably be called a character that's fixed and immutable or constantly shifting depending on the situation. Privilege or sensitivity can be leveled as critiques at any point in trying to discern who a person is and what they mean.

    I think you bring up some good points about empathy and I feel like there is maybe a way to communicate empathically that there might be more to the story than someone is considering; i.e. that social forces may be more relevant. I like the idea @Sex Chicken@Sex Chicken proposed of a "blind spot," but it's easy to see people taking umbrage to that as well. Sensitivity or "triggered!" call-outs seem more overtly confrontational, but it seems like any discourse has to have an "ok let's cut the BS" killswitch or discussions and debates would all just be therapy sessions.
     
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  23. ConorMcGregorsBeard

    ConorMcGregorsBeard The Face That Runs the Place

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    If you believe in the concept of "privilege" you''ll never be able to understand the nuances that are those interactions.

    I hate to generalize this way, but if you sit on the left, then yes. If you sit right of center there's little more insulting than being called privileged. Being called privileged is being told that neither you, nor anyone in your family ever accomplished anything and that you are where you are by complete coincidence.
     
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  24. Kneeblock

    Kneeblock Jumbo shrimp

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    Ok, this is the kind of response I was interested in hearing. Thanks.
     
  25. ConorMcGregorsBeard

    ConorMcGregorsBeard The Face That Runs the Place

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    For what it's worth, I completely understand why being called "too sensitive" or "triggered" would be as offensive to some people. But at this point in time it isn't fashionable to consider my ethnicity a victimized one, so I'm not lumped into that category very often.
     
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