Society UK politics thread

Welcome to our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to Sign Up today.
Sign up

Lars

Undefeated Monsters Champion & HoF Legend
Oct 17, 2015
32,424
44,373
It's secretly part of the Shrek universe, that wasn't animated it was just filmed like a documentary.
It’s weird because I’ve been there many times but still don’t believe it’s real. Like Australia. Also london is a shithole
 

Coast

Land of the Prince Bishops
Oct 18, 2017
593
1,056
The reason Corbyn was never elected was because of the smear campaign by the UK gutter rags, The Sun and Mail specifically, and also masses of online misinformation campaigns paid for by Tory donors. I think one of them even had a 24 page pull out on election day on why not to vote for him and was free of charge that day.

A lot of the stuff written about him greatly sensationalised. If there's one thing the UK gutter press is good at, its getting the working class to vote against their own interests. Corbyn wanted wealthy people to pay their fair share, he wanted to close tax loop holes etc and the corporation tax increases he proposed were still amongst the lowest in the world and still significantly less than companies pay in the US. Still newspapers had their sheep believe companies would simply leave the UK. Buy why wouldn't the press launch perhaps the biggest smear campaign against any politician that I've seen in my life time, after all most of them are owned by billionaires who would be negatively effected by a Labour victory.

I voted for him. I didn't agree with all his policies, and despite him being an amazing pubic speaker and campaigner who genuinely had the best interest of the people heart, I wasn't sure on his ability to actually lead. But I have no faith in the demagogue, Boris Johnson's leadership skills, or the Tory party in general.
 
Last edited:

Lars

Undefeated Monsters Champion & HoF Legend
Oct 17, 2015
32,424
44,373
Guys

Where, exactly, is Camelot? And what lake is the lady in even?
 

Zeph

TMMAC Addict
Jan 22, 2015
23,543
31,058
The guy got it wrong. Let me draw your attention to this part:

"In a nutshell, the complicated system of funding the monarchy works when the UK government makes a payment called the Sovereign Grant to the Royal Household every year. Its value is determined by how uch money the Crown Estate real estate portfolio has brought in."

Do you know who owns the Crown Estate? The Queen.

This video gives a good explanation of why we do not want to get rid of the Royal family.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhyYgnhhKFw
The Queen doesn't own the crown estates it's bequeathed to the title of the monarch. Should the Queen's family lose the crown for some reason then her family don't inherit the crown estates, but transfers to the new monarch. Should the monarchy be desolved then the crown estates will become the property of the state.
 
Last edited:

Lars

Undefeated Monsters Champion & HoF Legend
Oct 17, 2015
32,424
44,373
The Queen doesn't own the crown estates it's bequeathed to the title of the monarch. Should the Queen's family lose the crown for some reason then her family don't inherit the crown estates, but transfers to the new monarch. Should the monarchy be desolved then the crown estates will become property of the state.
I miss you
 

ThatOneDude

Commander in @Chief, Dick Army
First 100
Jan 14, 2015
35,392
34,238
The Queen doesn't own the crown estates it's bequeathed to the title of the monarch. Should the Queen's family lose the crown for some reason then her family don't inherit the crown estates, but transfers to the new monarch. Should the monarchy be desolved then the crown estates will become the property of the state.
How do you get a new royal family? This one is creepy.
 

Zeph

TMMAC Addict
Jan 22, 2015
23,543
31,058
How do you get a new royal family? This one is creepy.
When the rules of succession say so, or parliament passes a law which says so. If the rules of succession are say primogeniture and the monarch has no sons, then the throne would pass to the highest male cousin/uncle, but the private estates of the king would still pass onto the daughters.
 

ThatOneDude

Commander in @Chief, Dick Army
First 100
Jan 14, 2015
35,392
34,238
When the rules of succession say so, or parliament passes a law which says so. If the rules of succession are say primogeniture and the monarch has no sons, then the throne would pass to the highest male cousin/uncle, but the private estates of the king would still pass onto the daughters.
Interesting, it's all very foreign to me.
 

NotBanjaxo

Formerly someone other than Banjaxo
Nov 16, 2019
3,712
8,205
The reason Corbyn was never elected was because of the smear campaign by the UK gutter rags, The Sun and Mail specifically, and also masses of online misinformation campaigns paid for by Tory donors. I think one of them even had a 24 page pull out on election day on why not to vote for him and was free of charge that day.

A lot of the stuff written about him greatly sensationalised. If there's one thing the UK gutter press is good at, its getting the working class to vote against their own interests. Corbyn wanted wealthy people to pay their fair share, he wanted to close tax loop holes etc and the corporation tax increases he proposed were still amongst the lowest in the world and still significantly less than companies pay in the US. Still newspapers had their sheep believe companies would simply leave the UK. Buy why wouldn't the press launch perhaps the biggest smear campaign against any politician that I've seen in my life time, after all most of them are owned by billionaires who would be negatively effected by a Labour victory.

I voted for him. I didn't agree with all his policies, and despite him being an amazing pubic speaker and campaigner who genuinely had the best interest of the people heart, I wasn't sure on his ability to actually lead. But I have no faith in the demagogue, Boris Johnson's leadership skills, or the Tory party in general.
Corbyn was always dead set against maintaining Britain's nuclear deterrent.

Unfortunately for him, the trade unions to which he bowed were adamant that they would not accept the loss of jobs that would result from Britain's Trident missile equipped submarines being scrapped.

His solution to this quandary? Keep (and perhaps even update) the fleet of submarines capable of carrying those weapons, whilst getting rid of the weapons themselves, spending billions upon billions sending the subs we would no longer require out on pointless patrols with no deterrent on board.

Oh, and he also spoke about discussions with Argentina regarding the future of the Falklands.


What a fucking unelectable muppet.
 

Coast

Land of the Prince Bishops
Oct 18, 2017
593
1,056
What a fucking unelectable muppet.
Except he nearly was elected. 2017 was a hung parliament, remember May having to grovel to the queen for permission to form a government because the Tories lost their majority. And that was despite the toxic media campaign against him.
 

NotBanjaxo

Formerly someone other than Banjaxo
Nov 16, 2019
3,712
8,205
Except he nearly was elected. 2017 was a hung parliament, remember May having to grovel to the queen for permission to form a government because the Tories lost their majority. And that was despite the toxic media campaign against him.
I took that result to be a lot more of a reflection on how May's leadership was perceived, rather than Corbyn's popularity.

He went on to lose a landslide to Boris fucking Johnson, who is a buffoon.
 

kneeblock

Drapetomaniac
Apr 18, 2015
11,418
21,042
Awful public speaker with terrible maths, a horrible sense of arrogance and who has made racist comments (she's black and said that white nurses shouldn't be employed because non whites want to see a familiar face).


They're British Islands with British people living on them. The general public don't want to give them to Argentina.


It's never worked.


The IRA have committed terrorist atrocities. Failing to unilaterally condemn them is suicide here. Like someone asking a US politician if the 9/11 attacks were bad and he says, "ALL attacks are bad," and refuses to specifically condemn 9/11.


He was vocally critical of the EU in the past. Would have seemed very inconsistent if he became an ardent remainer.

You're not a Brit, so I forgive your lack of knowledge. If a Brit had asked the same questions about the Falklands and the IRA, they would have been ridiculed at best.
Yeah, I don't really know the cultural tenor there, so that's why this is interesting. But I want to push you a little further on these sentiments because I'm interested to know who specifically holds them.

Again, regarding the Falklands Islands, what segment of British society feels a strong attachment to them? Guam is an American imperial territory with Americans living on it, but you'd be hard pressed to find anyone in the states who has much of an opinion on it, assuming most even know it's part of the US. The Falklands are a bit different because you all fought a war over it, but that was awhile ago. So I guess what I'm mostly wondering is whether it's mostly just geezers who care about things like that. Do people under 40 have much attachment? If not, it seems likely that area of the empire will likely be divested in a generation.

Regarding the IRA, how do British politicians deal with condemnation of the IRA and the compromises made in Northern Ireland? It seems uncontroversial to condemn their terrorist past, but you do have people sitting in parliament who likely provided material and other support to them because they were mainstreamed into the political process, much as the Taliban is being mainstreamed in Afghanistan or as many terrorist white segregationists were not only mainstreamed but came to dominate politics in the South after the fall of Reconstruction around the turn of the 20th century. Here in the US, they tiptoed around the segregationists, much as in Afghanistan they're tiptoeing around the Taliban. Is the position toward the IRA still one of universal condemnation or is that mostly a tory position?

Regarding Corbyn's criticism of the EU, I don't know much about it. Was it mostly on sovereign nationalist grounds? Was it about financial policies? Was it regulations?

Any other Brits also feel free to chime in on these questions.
 

Coast

Land of the Prince Bishops
Oct 18, 2017
593
1,056
I took that result to be a lot more of a reflection on how May's leadership was perceived, rather than Corbyn's popularity.

He went on to lose a landslide to Boris fucking Johnson, who is a buffoon.
I took the result as a reflection on how fed up people were with Tory austerity. As for the second election, the media had had another couple of years to convince the over 45's the Jeremy Corbyn was communist terrorist support, a Russian Spy and would oversee the biggest immigration program the world has seen since the forming of the United States, and how on Xmas day he was personally going to visit each and everyone of them and piss on their grandkids.
 

NotBanjaxo

Formerly someone other than Banjaxo
Nov 16, 2019
3,712
8,205
Yeah, I don't really know the cultural tenor there, so that's why this is interesting. But I want to push you a little further on these sentiments because I'm interested to know who specifically holds them.

Again, regarding the Falklands Islands, what segment of British society feels a strong attachment to them? Guam is an American imperial territory with Americans living on it, but you'd be hard pressed to find anyone in the states who has much of an opinion on it, assuming most even know it's part of the US. The Falklands are a bit different because you all fought a war over it, but that was awhile ago. So I guess what I'm mostly wondering is whether it's mostly just geezers who care about things like that. Do people under 40 have much attachment? If not, it seems likely that area of the empire will likely be divested in a generation.

Regarding the IRA, how do British politicians deal with condemnation of the IRA and the compromises made in Northern Ireland? It seems uncontroversial to condemn their terrorist past, but you do have people sitting in parliament who likely provided material and other support to them because they were mainstreamed into the political process, much as the Taliban is being mainstreamed in Afghanistan or as many terrorist white segregationists were not only mainstreamed but came to dominate politics in the South after the fall of Reconstruction around the turn of the 20th century. Here in the US, they tiptoed around the segregationists, much as in Afghanistan they're tiptoeing around the Taliban. Is the position toward the IRA still one of universal condemnation or is that mostly a tory position?

Regarding Corbyn's criticism of the EU, I don't know much about it. Was it mostly on sovereign nationalist grounds? Was it about financial policies? Was it regulations?

Any other Brits also feel free to chime in on these questions.
I was a kid when the Falklands war was fought. Everyone I know of my generation or older would never consider any compromise on the status of the islands as a UK territory. I can't speak for the younger generations though.

With the IRA / Sinn Fein, there is a grudging acceptance that a political solution to the issue was required, although many over here regard Sinn Fein members like Gerry Adams as terrorist enablers.
 

NotBanjaxo

Formerly someone other than Banjaxo
Nov 16, 2019
3,712
8,205
I took the result as a reflection on how fed up people were with Tory austerity. As for the second election, the media had had another couple of years to convince the over 45's the Jeremy Corbyn was communist terrorist support, a Russian Spy and would oversee the biggest immigration program the world has seen since the forming of the United States, and how on Xmas day he was personally going to visit each and everyone of them and piss on their grandkids.
It depends what you mean by "the media". The British pro Tory tabloids such as Daily Mail, Sun, Star, Express certainly portrayed him in a bad light, but others like the Mirror, Guardian and Independent didn't. The television news were fairly even handed.
 

conor mcgregor nut hugger

I only fight real fighters
Oct 24, 2015
60,248
54,758
I took that result to be a lot more of a reflection on how May's leadership was perceived, rather than Corbyn's popularity.

He went on to lose a landslide to Boris fucking Johnson, who is a buffoon.
Outsider perspective, but I saw the two elections as Boris being a craftier politician than I ever gave him credit for.

I still think he's a buffoon, but he's cleverer than I thought he was. Unlike May, who lost the Tory majority, Boris was able to make the entire election about Brexit, to the point that enough of the population voted Tory without thinking about all of Boris's other terrible policies or personality traits.

Boris then passed essentially the same Brexit deal that Theresa May failed to pass on three separate occasions.

He may be a terrible person but I had to give him credit for succeeding in a terrible act - exploiting the stupidity of the common people.
 

NotBanjaxo

Formerly someone other than Banjaxo
Nov 16, 2019
3,712
8,205
Outsider perspective, but I saw the two elections as Boris being a craftier politician than I ever gave him credit for.

I still think he's a buffoon, but he's cleverer than I thought he was. Unlike May, who lost the Tory majority, Boris was able to make the entire election about Brexit, to the point that enough of the population voted Tory without thinking about all of Boris's other terrible policies or personality traits.

Boris then passed essentially the same Brexit deal that Theresa May failed to pass on three separate occasions.

He may be a terrible person but I had to give him credit for succeeding in a terrible act - exploiting the stupidity of the common people.
Oh for sure, he's clever, he's a buffoon as well though lol.

I think that's the skill of a successful politician though, to focus attention on key points with a favourable slant, to skew opinion against the opponent by cherry picking statistics, and keep the unpopular things as far out of the spotlight as possible. Or to put it another way, to be the best and most personable liar.
 

conor mcgregor nut hugger

I only fight real fighters
Oct 24, 2015
60,248
54,758
Oh for sure, he's clever, he's a buffoon as well though lol.

I think that's the skill of a successful politician though, to focus attention on key points with a favourable slant, to skew opinion against the opponent by cherry picking statistics, and keep the unpopular things as far out of the spotlight as possible. Or to put it another way, to be the best and most personable liar.
It is but you also have to consider the voters. Trump is not even a little bit clever in any way and he was able to do most of the things you've listed here, simply because the average Trump voter is a fucking retard.

Idk whether that applies to the average Tory voter in the UK.
 

NotBanjaxo

Formerly someone other than Banjaxo
Nov 16, 2019
3,712
8,205
It is but you also have to consider the voters. Trump is not even a little bit clever in any way and he was able to do most of the things you've listed here, simply because the average Trump voter is a fucking retard.

Idk whether that applies to the average Tory voter in the UK.
Trump was something different, not a career politician. I've always considered this to be a big part in his success.