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Filthy

guess I should STFU
Jun 28, 2016
15,967
20,265
And it feels so good to be alive and on top
My reach, is global
My tower, secure
My cause, is noble
My power, is pure

I can hand out a million vaccinations
Or let 'em all die of exasperation
Have 'em all healed of their lacerations
Have 'em all killed by assassination

I can make anybody go to prison
Just because I don't like 'em
And I can do anything with no permission
I have it all under my command because

I can guide a missile by satellite
By satellite
By satellite
And I can hit a target through a telescope
Through a telescope
Through a telescope
And I can end the planet in a holocaust
In a holocaust
...

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLUX0y4EptA
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
947
1,509
Dave's Song of the Day

Friday – Rebecca Black

Friday song of the day: Today’s song is often listed as a contender for worst song of all time.




It was quite the phenomenon ten years ago. What was basically a vanity recording for an eighth grader got some attention and suddenly became the most popular video on YouTube that year.

The 13-year-old singer was Rebecca Black, and her mother paid $4,000 to ARK Music to write and produce a song and music video starring Black. The song chosen was Friday, a simplistic song about the joys of the coming weekend. The music was standard pop and Rebecca Black’s autotuned singing was not very good. ARK Music put the song on services such as iTunes and the video on YouTube on February 10th, 2011. It probably would have ended there with little fanfare, but Friday inexplicably went from obscure teenage video to internet sensation. On March 11th, the video had about 3,000 views on YouTube, but then for some reason went viral as people told their friends about the “so bad it’s good” nature of the song. A week later Friday had 18 million views.

By the end of the year, it was the most-viewed video on YouTube for 2011, with over 180 million views. While it was not available on record, its digital download sold well enough for Friday to place at #58 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. As for Rebecca Black, she got unexpected fame, but also a lot of hate. It must have been rough for a 13-year-old girl to be the subject of such derision, but she seems to have taken it with a mostly good sense of humor. Some felt that Friday was the worst song of all time, but to me that’s overstating it. Friday is very far from good, but it’s simply bland and annoying rather than horrific. I maintain that the worst song of all time is My Pal Foot-Foot by The Shaggs. [which was song of the day for September 16th, 2014, here: My Pal Foot Foot – The Shaggs ]

A little over a week ago, on February 10th, 2021, Friday celebrated its 10th anniversary. On that date, the now 23-year-old Rebecca Black released a remix of Friday, assisted by artists such as Big Freedia, Dorian Electra, and 3OH!3. As produced by Dylan Brady of 100 Gecs, the updated remix is if anything even more annoying than the original. The video has a few elements of the original, but updated with computer graphics.

2011 original video

View: https://youtu.be/kfVsfOSbJY0


2021 remix video

View: https://youtu.be/iCFOcqsnc9Y


Tomorrow: She said she’d always been a dancer
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
947
1,509
Dave's Song of the Day

She Came In Through the Bathroom Window – Joe Cocker

Saturday song of the day: Today’s song was inspired by a fan breaking into a rock star’s home.




It’s hard to imagine just how big The Beatles were in the mid and late 1960s. They basically could not go anywhere without being mobbed by fans. In addition, there was a rabid group of Beatles fans that the band called “Apple scruffs” who hung out near the Apple Corps record company offices, the Abbey Road recording studio, and the homes of the band members, hoping to interact with the band. On occasion, the Apple scruffs stepped way over the line and invaded the band’s private lives.

One such incident took place at Paul McCartney’s home in 1967 or 1968, when a fan noticed a ladder on the property, as well as a partially opened bathroom window on an upper floor. The fan, Diane Ashley, decided to use the ladder to climb up to the window. She described it as “We were bored, he was out and so we decided to pay him a visit. We found a ladder in his garden and stuck it up at the bathroom window which he’d left slightly open. I was the one who climbed up and got in.” After Diane got in the house, she went downstairs, opened the door, and let other people in. Several personal items were stolen.

Other Apple scruffs were more benign. One of them, Margo Bird, describes what happened after the break-in, “There were really two groups of Apple Scruffs – those who would break in and those who would just wait outside with cameras and autograph books. I used to take Paul’s dog for a walk and got to know him quite well. I knew there was one picture he particularly wanted back – a colour-tinted picture of him in a Thirties frame. I knew who had taken this and got it back for him.”

While putting together songs for the 1969 Beatles album Abbey Road, Paul wrote a song inspired by the break-in that he called She Came In Through the Bathroom Window. It was a relatively minor song by Beatles standards and was included on the album as part of a long medley of eight short songs. The medley stretched to sixteen minutes and included, in order, You Never Give Me Your Money, Sun King, Mean Mr. Mustard, Polythene Pam, She Came In Through the Bathroom Window, Golden Slumbers, Carry That Weight, and The End. The portion devoted to She Came In Through The Bathroom Window ran for under two minutes.

Abbey Road was released on September 26th, 1969. Before the record was even released, however, The Beatles gave singer Joe Cocker permission to record a cover of She Came In Through the Bathroom Window for his second album, Joe Cocker! McCartney had liked Cocker’s previous cover of their song With a Little Help from My Friends and thought he would do a good job with another Beatles song. Cocker’s album came out in November 1969, a bit over a month after Abbey Road, and the Joe Cocker! album’s third single was his version of She Came In Through the Bathroom Window. While The Beatles never released the song as a single, Cocker’s cover was a minor hit, placing at #30 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Joe Cocker, November 1969

View: https://youtu.be/TedvuER50Lk


The Beatles, September 1969

View: https://youtu.be/NVv7IzEVf3M


Tomorrow: Don’t let the days go by
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
947
1,509
Dave's Song of the Day

Glycerine – Bush

Sunday song of the day: Today’s song is about the singer’s relationship with his girlfriend.




The English band Bush had a successful first album with Sixteen Stone, which was released in late 1994 and sold over 6 million copies in the United States for sextuple Platinum status. The fourth single from the album, Glycerine, was written by the band’s singer and rhythm guitar player Gavin Rossdale about his relationship with his girlfriend at the time, model Jasmine Lewis. The title referred to the substance used in various skincare products as well as the explosive nitroglycerin. Rossdale felt that the relationship was often on the verge of exploding, equating love to a bomb.

Glycerine was released as a single in November 1995, almost a year after the album’s release. It went to #1 on the Alternative Airplay chart, #4 on the Mainstream Rock chart, and #28 on the overall Billboard Hot 100 chart. This made it Bush’s biggest hit in the United States, surpassing its predecessor, Comedown, which had peaked at #30 on the Hot 100. Bush remained popular in the US through the end of the 1990s, with their second album, 1996’s Razorblade Suitcase, going triple Platinum and the third, 1999’s The Science of Things, going Platinum. After that, sales dropped considerably.

As for Rossdale and his model girlfriend; they broke up. In 1995 he met Gwen Stefani of No Doubt and they were married from 2002 to 2016.

View: https://youtu.be/VTa79aZ87Ps


Video

View: https://youtu.be/bvXbHN5Gijw


Tomorrow: With you I’m not shy
 

Enock-O-Lypse Now!

Underneath Denver International Airport
Jun 19, 2016
8,097
14,634
Dave's Song of the Day

Glycerine – Bush

Sunday song of the day: Today’s song is about the singer’s relationship with his girlfriend.




The English band Bush had a successful first album with Sixteen Stone, which was released in late 1994 and sold over 6 million copies in the United States for sextuple Platinum status. The fourth single from the album, Glycerine, was written by the band’s singer and rhythm guitar player Gavin Rossdale about his relationship with his girlfriend at the time, model Jasmine Lewis. The title referred to the substance used in various skincare products as well as the explosive nitroglycerin. Rossdale felt that the relationship was often on the verge of exploding, equating love to a bomb.

Glycerine was released as a single in November 1995, almost a year after the album’s release. It went to #1 on the Alternative Airplay chart, #4 on the Mainstream Rock chart, and #28 on the overall Billboard Hot 100 chart. This made it Bush’s biggest hit in the United States, surpassing its predecessor, Comedown, which had peaked at #30 on the Hot 100. Bush remained popular in the US through the end of the 1990s, with their second album, 1996’s Razorblade Suitcase, going triple Platinum and the third, 1999’s The Science of Things, going Platinum. After that, sales dropped considerably.

As for Rossdale and his model girlfriend; they broke up. In 1995 he met Gwen Stefani of No Doubt and they were married from 2002 to 2016.

View: https://youtu.be/VTa79aZ87Ps


Video

View: https://youtu.be/bvXbHN5Gijw


Tomorrow: With you I’m not shy
Gavin nailed his role in Constantine ...thought for sure he would have went superstar status in Hollywood ...but didn't work out
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
947
1,509
Dave's Song of the Day

Magnet and Steel – Walter Egan

Monday song of the day: Today’s song was inspired by Stevie Nicks and a license plate.




While working on his 1977 debut album, Fundamental Roll, singer/songwriter Walter Egan had the help of Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac. In the course of working on that album, Egan developed a crush on Nicks, but didn’t do anything about it because she and Buckingham were a couple at the time. After a recording session, he happened upon a car while driving home, “It was on my drive home at 3 a.m. from Van Nuys to Pomona that I happened to be behind a metal-flake-blue Continental with ground effects and a diamond window in back. I was inspired by the car’s license plate: ‘Not Shy.’”

The license plate supplied one of the key repeated phrases in the song, “With you I’m not shy.” He took this notion and combined it with his unspoken attraction to Stevie Nicks, in which he likened her to a magnet. The resulting song was Magnet and Steel. Egan claims that with the two elements – the “Not Shy” license plate and his attraction to Nicks – in place, the song crystalized very quickly, saying, “By the time I pulled into my driveway I had formulated the lyrics and come up with the magnet metaphor. From there the song was finished in 15 minutes.”

Magnet and Steel was written too late to include on that first album, but he did record it as the centerpiece for his second album, 1978’s Not Shy. Once again, Buckingham and Nicks were involved in that record, with Buckingham helping produce and Stevie Nicks providing backing vocals. Thus, on the recording of Magnet and Steel, the unspecified love interest of the song was heard singing backup.

The song was released as a single in May 1978 and was a Top 10 hit, placing at #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It was Egan’s only record to crack the Top 40, although 1983’s Full Moon Fire came close at #46.

Not long after Magnet and Steel was a hit, Nicks and Buckingham broke up, and she and Walter Egan very briefly dated.

View: https://youtu.be/gqIlhQnn2z4



Tomorrow: Racin’ through my brain
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
947
1,509
Dave's Song of the Day

There She Goes – The La’s

Tuesday song of the day: Today’s song charted in the United Kingdom four separate times.




The La’s came from Liverpool and put out exactly one studio album, but they are well known for an iconic song. That song is There She Goes, which was first released by small label Go! Records in 1988. The song seems to be about a girl but lines like “Racin’ through my brain” and “Pulsing through my vein” has led some to think it may be about heroin. Or it might just be a metaphor for how the girl affects the singer. Songwriter Lee Mavers has never confirmed it one way or another.

The original 1988 single was produced by Bob Andrews and did not fair all that well, placing at #59 on the UK singles chart. Later, the band recorded an album, The La’s, and included was There She Goes, with the original recording remixed by Steve Lillywhite. The album was released on October 1st, 1990, with the remixed There She Goes released as a single three weeks later. This time it did considerably better, placing at #13 on the UK singles chart and breaking through in the United States at #2 on the Alternative Airplay chart and #49 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song has endured way out of proportion with its sales in the late 1980s and early 1990s, becoming a classic of the Brit Pop genre. The remix was released again as a single in 1999, placing at #65 on the UK singles chart, and then the original single was re-released in 2008 to celebrate its 20th anniversary. This re-release peaked at #95 on the UK singles chart.

The La’s disbanded in 1992 and have never released another studio album, despite three short reunions since then.

Original 1988 single

View: https://youtu.be/dJ8T5e_FSP8


Remixed album version, 1990

View: https://youtu.be/-CCfIJgVM6M


Tomorrow: The message may not move me
 

Thuglife13

👦🏻🍕🍦🍩🍺
Dec 15, 2018
7,275
10,773
Dave's Song of the Day

There She Goes – The La’s

Tuesday song of the day: Today’s song charted in the United Kingdom four separate times.




The La’s came from Liverpool and put out exactly one studio album, but they are well known for an iconic song. That song is There She Goes, which was first released by small label Go! Records in 1988. The song seems to be about a girl but lines like “Racin’ through my brain” and “Pulsing through my vein” has led some to think it may be about heroin. Or it might just be a metaphor for how the girl affects the singer. Songwriter Lee Mavers has never confirmed it one way or another.

The original 1988 single was produced by Bob Andrews and did not fair all that well, placing at #59 on the UK singles chart. Later, the band recorded an album, The La’s, and included was There She Goes, with the original recording remixed by Steve Lillywhite. The album was released on October 1st, 1990, with the remixed There She Goes released as a single three weeks later. This time it did considerably better, placing at #13 on the UK singles chart and breaking through in the United States at #2 on the Alternative Airplay chart and #49 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The song has endured way out of proportion with its sales in the late 1980s and early 1990s, becoming a classic of the Brit Pop genre. The remix was released again as a single in 1999, placing at #65 on the UK singles chart, and then the original single was re-released in 2008 to celebrate its 20th anniversary. This re-release peaked at #95 on the UK singles chart.

The La’s disbanded in 1992 and have never released another studio album, despite three short reunions since then.

Original 1988 single

View: https://youtu.be/dJ8T5e_FSP8


Remixed album version, 1990

View: https://youtu.be/-CCfIJgVM6M


Tomorrow: The message may not move me
This will always be the "So I Married An Axe Murderer" song...

 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
947
1,509
Dave's Song of the Day

I Dig Rock and Roll Music – Peter, Paul and Mary

Wednesday song of the day: Despite what the title says, today’s song is an insult.




The trio of Peter, Paul and Mary were big names in the folk music revival of the early 1960s. They had several mainstream hits, including covers of fellow folkie Bob Dylan’s Blowin’ in the Wind at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right at #9. Their own original, Puff the Magic Dragon, also hit #2.

As it turned out though, the folk revival could be a bit snooty and insular, and there was a huge backlash when its biggest star, Bob Dylan, “went electric” and started making more rock-oriented albums. Many in the folk music clique, including Paul Stookey – the Paul of Peter, Paul and Mary – felt that rock was inferior and frivolous, and lacked the “authenticity” of folk. The trio’s Mary Travers had said, “When the fad changed from folk to rock, they didn’t take along any good writers,” conveniently forgetting that folk’s biggest star and best songwriter, Bob Dylan, had gone over to rock.

Yet in the wake of The Beatles, folk was becoming far less popular in the mid-1960s. Stookey didn’t like that very much, and as a reaction to rock and roll supplanting folk on the pop charts, he co-wrote I Dig Rock and Roll Music with James Mason and Dave Dixon. While the title seems to be an endorsement of rock, the lyrics make it very clear that Stookey most certainly not “dig” rock and roll music. The song satirized The Mamas and the Papas, Donovan, and The Beatles, and in general denigrated rock music as not being a serious art form. For example, the line “The message may not move me/Or mean a great deal to me” implies that rock is meaningless kid’s stuff compared to the more thoughtful themes in folk music. Later, the song said that “…when The Beatles tell you/They’ve got a word “love” to sell you/They mean exactly what they say.” Apparently Stookey was bitter about The Beatles’ commercial success with songs that told about love instead of high-minded songs about things like magic dragons and lemon trees.

I Dig Rock and Roll Music was included on Peter, Paul and Mary’s Album 1700 in August 1967, and was promptly released as a single. Most listeners took it at face value and didn’t notice what the lyrics were actually saying about rock, and the song was a hit. It placed at #9 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Another song from Album 1700 was released as a single a full two years later and became Peter, Paul and Mary’s biggest – and last – hit. Leaving on a Jet Plane, written by John Denver, became the trio’s only #1 song when released in 1969. Peter, Paul and Mary broke up in 1970 to pursue solo careers. They re-formed in 1978, but the time for folk music on the pop charts had long since passed by then.


View: https://youtu.be/wRQyaRdNS0Q


Tomorrow: I was looking at myself
 

Lou Dog

Went to the Moon
First 100
Jan 17, 2015
50,507
54,131
For any fans of Sublime and the reggae-rock groups they inspired, this 53 song album of Sublime songs is a fucking winner:

View: https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjqwrRfXwK7T_va1ydcUNqqJ68ZeLa78a
Nice, thanks
Some real great covers
Just gave em all a listen
Some really hit and had a lil bit of Nowell soul
Pepper (x2)
Kyle Smith
Mike Pinto
Bumpin Uglies
Johnny Cosmic
Ballyhoo
Vana Liya
Miguel Happoldt
and others

hard presence to live up to and brad's songs are all over the place so it is a tough act to follow
 
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