Which rap is better...west or east coast (Poll)

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Which rap is better

  • West coast

    Votes: 12 48.0%
  • East coast

    Votes: 6 24.0%
  • Midwest

    Votes: 4 16.0%
  • Dirty south

    Votes: 3 12.0%

  • Total voters
    25

lookoutawhale

Mammal of the Sea
Jan 20, 2015
4,404
7,294
I would say the westcoast rap sounded much better to me.

Dre, Snoop, Eazy E, Tupac had nicer sounding music and chorus. The east coast rap seemed more heavily into the lyrics, but the music seemed very lacking. Just basic beats and not much chorus.

I dont know if there is some distinction between R&B and rap but i liked how the westcoast had different guys/girls sing the hook before getting back into the rapping. Sounded more melodious to me.

East coast rap always sounded really basic without all the bells and whistles until later when Puff daddy/biggie/jay-z started adding that to match that westcoast sound.
 

Megaterio Llamas

Vigorously working member
First 100
Jan 15, 2015
7,570
9,151
Again, I'm not familiar with the original artists that recorded these songs, just the Dick Cheese renditions. Dick's genius is in making rap accessible to the older crowd, and breathing new life into what has become a tired genre:

I have no idea who recorded the original version of this number but in Dick's capable hands it is reborn as a lively toe-tapper!


 

OhWhopDaChamp

TMMAC Addict
Apr 20, 2015
6,222
8,794
West Coast- Ice Cube & Mackevelli
Midwest- just forgot his damn name. The crazy dude who likes acid. Was on movie soundtrack with Pac called Why?
East Coast- Jay Z
South- Goodie Mobb
 

kneeblock

Read Achille Mbembe
Apr 18, 2015
9,946
18,514
I think the young guys these days have brought rap back in a way that makes me nostalgic for yesterday. Anyone can listen to Kendrick's To Pimp a Butterfly, Lupe's Tetsuo and Youth, J. Cole's 2014 Forest Hills Drive and Childish Gambino's Because the Internet and plainly see that their musical and lyrical influences are pretty on point. Heck, I'll even throw Drake's If You're Reading This It's Too Late in there. People knock Drake, but every single person in the hood has one of his albums or bumps their head to his singles. I like the kid.

Rap has really come a long way since I was a kid buying Word Up and Right On Magazine begging my mom for Big Daddy Kane's medallion. My friend and I were just talking about how the attempts to redefine it or act as if there was some unified movement early on are pretty disingenuous. Like anything, people had different reasons for getting into or out of it. Some viewed it as their news dispatch from the streets, some as a political vehicle and some as just a way to rock a crowd and have fun.

What I like about today's rappers is they've recaptured a lot of that spirit. It's not just about being a celebrity for many of them like it was for a certain period in the 2000s.
 

Megaterio Llamas

Vigorously working member
First 100
Jan 15, 2015
7,570
9,151
I remember begging my mom for Bruno Gerussi's medallion back in my day. 'We can't afford it' was the answer I always got, lol.

I can't imagine I have survived to see and experience an age where men wax rhapsodic about songs with names like "To Pimp A Butterfly'. Fucking surreaL.