Science: Lift Heavier Weights/Less Reps To Get Stronger

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Haulport

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Jan 17, 2015
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Problem is, nervous system develop is highly specific. Increasing leg extension strength without muscle gain, won't lead to much improvement in the squat.
I think they're what they are saying is that the muscle increase is the same but the strength is 10% greater when working heavy weight with less reps.
 

Leigh

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Jan 26, 2015
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I think they're what they are saying is that the muscle increase is the same but the strength is 10% greater when working heavy weight with less reps.
They are. But the strength increase is only specific to the movement they work. It doesn't carry over to anything else.
 

Haulport

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They are. But the strength increase is only specific to the movement they work. It doesn't carry over to anything else.
How do you know that? I don't remember seeing that anywhere in the article (and I'm too lazy to go look).
 

Lord Vutulaki

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Jan 16, 2015
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They are. But the strength increase is only specific to the movement they work. It doesn't carry over to anything else.
If the same technique is applied surely there's some carry over from weight training to say grappling

You take your regular BJJ blue and have him train heavy pulling be it BB rows, chins, DLs etc then have him apply a front choke/'headlock or guillotine id say that he's going to be more effective at that move than before he weight trained right? Im talking same guy and same technique against the same training partner or opponent

Same goes for punching but the opposite in that IME heavy pulling and core work will assist in the velocity of your punch given equal technique but benchpressing isnt going to do shit for your punching power and is more likely to hinder it.

Training technique is king im not debating that at all, Ive trained with Thai Boxers in TL who did pads, sparred and ran with zero calisthenics (not even sit ups) and getting hit by one of them wasnt fun Im just wondering/asking if maybe there is some carry over from resistance training to fighting beyond hypertrophy
 

Leigh

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Jan 26, 2015
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If the same technique is applied surely there's some carry over from weight training to say grappling

You take your regular BJJ blue and have him train heavy pulling be it BB rows, chins, DLs etc then have him apply a front choke/'headlock or guillotine id say that he's going to be more effective at that move than before he weight trained right? Im talking same guy and same technique against the same training partner or opponent

Same goes for punching but the opposite in that IME heavy pulling and core work will assist in the velocity of your punch given equal technique but benchpressing isnt going to do shit for your punching power and is more likely to hinder it.

Training technique is king im not debating that at all, Ive trained with Thai Boxers in TL who did pads, sparred and ran with zero calisthenics (not even sit ups) and getting hit by one of them wasnt fun Im just wondering/asking if maybe there is some carry over from resistance training to fighting beyond hypertrophy
Not beyond beginner gains. Remember, we're saying that NO hypertrophy occurs. If they do rows and build bigger lats and biceps etc then of course they'll get stronger.

If you got a 70kg Olympic wrestler and a 70kg Olympic lifter and got put in a bear hug by both of them, the wrestler would feel stronger, even though the weight lifter can pull more weight.
 

Tuc Ouiner

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May 19, 2016
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Ever heard Bas Rutten's story about being shitfaced in a Kiev nightclub and getting bear hugged by a very shitfaced Paul "Polar Bear" Varelans? Funny story.
 

Leigh

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Jan 26, 2015
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So if I increase my squat and my good morning, those do not carry over to anything else? Seriously?
If you increase your squat by building muscle, yes that will carry over, because you have bigger muscles.

If you don't build more muscle and your squat increases through technique, no it won't carry over.
 

Antonio Bruno

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Aug 3, 2017
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If you increase your squat by building muscle, yes that will carry over, because you have bigger muscles.

If you don't build more muscle and your squat increases through technique, no it won't carry over.
So the bulk of exercise science which shows that it is quite possible to gain increases in strength via increases in motor unit recruitment, inter- and intra-muscular coordination, rate coding and rate of force development is wrong? Given that the conjugate training system is based around this, and works by Siff, Verkoshanky and others, and people training using this system regularly improve their deadlift by doing things other than deadlifting, results seem to differ. This is true of athletes staying in the same weight class with no changes in body composition.
 

Leigh

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Jan 26, 2015
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So the bulk of exercise science which shows that it is quite possible to gain increases in strength via increases in motor unit recruitment, inter- and intra-muscular coordination, rate coding and rate of force development is wrong? Given that the conjugate training system is based around this, and works by Siff, Verkoshanky and others, and people training using this system regularly improve their deadlift by doing things other than deadlifting, results seem to differ. This is true of athletes staying in the same weight class with no changes in body composition.
Motor recruitment and intramuscular coordination is driven by the CNS, which is neurological.