Listen What are you listening to RIGHT NOW?

Welcome to our Community
Wanting to join the rest of our members? Feel free to Sign Up today.
Sign up

SongExotic2

ATM 3 CHAMPION OF THE WORLD
First 100
Jan 16, 2015
17,886
37,490

SongExotic2

ATM 3 CHAMPION OF THE WORLD
First 100
Jan 16, 2015
17,886
37,490
Fuck I think the Marshall Mathers LP was the first rap music I got. Iirc my mum snapped it.
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
722
1,322
Dave's Song of the Day

This Is a Call – Foo Fighters

Sunday song of the day: The creator of today’s song played all the instruments himself.




In the summer of 1994 Dave Grohl was the drummer of iconic group Nirvana, but Nirvana had essentially ended with the suicide of the band’s singer, songwriter, and main creative force Kurt Cobain in April of that year. Grohl had just gotten married, and after the death of his bandmate and friend he didn’t know what he would do with the rest of his life. While working through these issues, he decided to continue his musical life with a new band. At first, the band consisted of just him. He wrote the songs, sang, and played all the instruments on the album (with the exception of a guest guitarist on one track). He called this project Foo Fighters, for an old term that World War II airmen used for unidentified flying objects.

One of the first songs he wrote after Cobain’s death was This Is a Call. The lyrics were mostly meaningless, but hints within the song pointed to it being a resolve to move on despite the loss of Cobain and the end of Nirvana. Grohl said of the line “This is a call to all my past resignations” in the chorus that he meant it as an acknowledgement of the past and a look toward a different future: “It’s just sort of like a little wave to all the people I ever played music with, people I’ve been friends with, all my relationships, my family. It’s a hello, and in a way a thank you.” He later added “I felt like I had nothing to lose, and I didn’t necessarily want to be the drummer of Nirvana for the rest of my life without Nirvana. I thought I should try something I’d never done before and I’d never stood up in front of a band and been the lead singer, which was fucking horrifying and still is!”

The Foo Fighters album was released in July 1995. Most of the album’s songs had been written while Grohl was part of Nirvana, and a few even before then. Only a couple, including This Is a Call, were written after Cobain’s death. While the Foo Fighters album was a solo project, before it was released Grohl formed an actual band for touring and for future recordings. This Is a Call was the first song released as a single from the album and peaked at #6 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart and #2 on the Alternative Airplay chart.

Since the first album twenty-five years ago, Foo Fighters has developed into one of the more important bands of the past few decades. The band has released nine studio albums, had many hit records, and won twelve Grammy awards.


View: https://youtu.be/h-Rnr3wTX9I


Tomorrow: We’re so happy and that’s how we’re gonna stay
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
722
1,322
Dave's Song of the Day

Do-Wah-Diddy – The Exciters

Monday song of the day: Today’s song was a bit of a flop for the original artists, but the cover version was a huge hit.




The legendary songwriting team of Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich had written a hit for girl group The Crystals with Da Do Ron Ron in early 1963. After this, they decided to try that nonsense word formula again, and wrote a song called Do-Wah-Diddy. It was recorded by The Exciters, a group of one man and three women who had recently scored a big hit with Tell Him. The Exciters recording of Do-Wah-Diddy was released in November 1963 and did not perform very well, topping out at #78 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

English band Manfred Mann (named after their keyboard player and singer, Manfred Mann) decided to record the song and released their version in July 1964. The female-dominated Exciters had sung the song about a male, and since Manfred Mann was an all-male group, the love interest in the song was changed to a woman. The title was also changed, with the dashes deleted and an extra “diddy” added, resulting in Do Wah Diddy Diddy. This cover version was a hit, placing at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 and becoming a classic. After the Manfred Mann hit, Do Wah Diddy Diddy has been covered over seventy times by various artists, including Jan & Dean, Rick Derringer, Neil Diamond, and even the Muppets.

Manfred Mann had quite a career with cover songs. I have featured him twice before as Song of the Day, on October 15th, 2014 covering Bob Dylan’s Mighty Quinn (Here: Mighty Quinn – Manfred Mann ) and as Manfred Mann’s Earth Band on April 11th, 2020 covering Bruce Springsteen’s Blinded By the Light (Here: Blinded by the Light – Manfred Mann’s Earth Band ).

Do-Wah-Diddy, The Exciters, 1963

View: https://youtu.be/2Uxb6N2rlzU


Do Wah Diddy Diddy, Manfred Mann, 1964

View: https://youtu.be/rQl7jlKfz84


Tomorrow: Being with you has opened my eyes
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
722
1,322
Dave's Song of the Day

All the Things She Said – t.A.T.u.

Tuesday song of the day: Today’s song was a cynical – but successful – effort to create a hit based on shock value.




In 1999, Russian record producer Ivan Shapovalov came up with a concept for an act consisting of two teenage lesbians. He held auditions and finally settled on two 14-year old girls, Lena Katina and Julia Volkova. They had both previously been a part of the children’s singing group Neposedi. He called the pair t.A.T.u., which was an acronym for the Russian phrase meaning “This girl loves that girl.” Never mind that Lena and Julia were not lesbians. They had the right look and the lesbian angle would gain notoriety.

In 2000 t.A.T.u. recorded their first album, in Russian. The first single off the album was Ya Soshla S Uma (English translation: I’ve Lost My Mind), released in December 2000. The song was later reworked into English as All the Things She Said. Both versions, of course, were based on the two underage girls in love theme, as were the videos for the songs (The videos were essentially identical except one used the Russian song and one used the English version). The shock value worked, first in Russia where Ya Soshla S Uma was a hit, and then in the rest of the world when All the Things She Said was released in 2002. The song charted at #1 in several European countries, and when released in the United States, it peaked at #20 on the Billboard Hot 100, aided by heavy airplay of the video, and t.A.T.u. appearing on several television shows to perform.

Eventually the fact that the girls were playing the role set up for them by Shapovalov became common knowledge. t.A.T.u. remained popular in Russia and much of Europe and released six studio albums before breaking up in 2011. In the United States, they are mostly remembered as fake lesbians who had a single hit based on that false premise.

View: https://youtu.be/8mGBaXPlri8


Ya Soshla S Uma

View: https://youtu.be/-F-JfWqMG6g


Tomorrow: In all my dark despair
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
722
1,322
Dave's Song of the Day

Killing Me Softly with His Song – Lori Lieberman

Wednesday song of the day: Today’s song won Grammys in two different decades, the 1970s and the 1990s.




Nineteen-year-old Lori Lieberman attended a Don McLean show at The Troubadour in Los Angeles in 1971. At the time, McLean’s hit American Pie was just starting to take off. It was another song, however, that grabbed Lieberman’s attention. When McLean started performing Empty Chairs, it struck a chord with Lieberman, who felt that it encapsulated many of the things she felt. As she puts it, “I didn’t know who he was, but from the moment he walked on stage, I was spellbound. I felt as if he knew me and his songs were about my life. I felt like he sang into my soul.” She started scribbling notes on a napkin for a song about how McLean’s performance affected her.

Unlike most nineteen-year-olds, however, Lieberman was a legitimate songwriter and singer. She had recently been signed to a management contract by the famous songwriting team of Charles Fox and Norman Gimbel. After the concert, she went to Fox and Gimbel with the idea for a song. Gimbel had previously come up with the line “killing me softly with his blues” as the seed of an idea for a song that he hadn’t yet fleshed out and decided that the line fit perfectly with Lieberman’s idea. Lieberman insisted on changing the word “blues” simply to “song” as an improvement. Once the lyrics were completed, Fox supplied the music. While Fox and Gimbel were listed as the songwriters for Killing Me Softly with His Song and Lieberman was not credited, they freely admitted that the concept and theme originated with Lori Lieberman and her reaction to the Don McLean performance.

In late 1971, Lieberman recorded her first album, titled simply Lori Lieberman. It was released in early 1972, and the first single from the album was Killing Me Softly with His Song. The single failed to chart. This was understandable, as the first effort from a young, unknown artist. Also, while the song was very good, honestly there was nothing very special about Lieberman’s recording.

The song did get the attention of Roberta Flack, however. She heard the Lieberman original on an airplane. She liked Killing Me Softly with His Song and recorded a cover version. Flack was an established singer who had recently had a #1 hit with The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face. Her record was released in January 1973 and became a huge hit. It rose to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and stayed in the top spot for five weeks. Later it won two Grammy awards, for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female and Record of the Year.

In 1996 The Fugees released a version, with Lauren Hill singing in the style of the Roberta Flack cover, and rap interludes added. The Fugees cover used the shortened title Killing Me Softly. It peaked at #2 on the U.S. Airplay chart and won a Grammy for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal.

Lieberman mostly retired from music in the 1980s to raise a family, but she restarted her career in the mid-1990s. She was no longer associated with Fox and Gimbel, and for some reason in the 2000s they began to refute the story that she had been much involved in the creation of Killing Me Softly with His Song. They even took issue with Don McLean’s web site repeating the story of Lieberman being inspired to write the song by his Troubadour performance. The dispute was settled when McLean’s lawyers presented articles from the 1970s showing that Fox and Gimbel themselves acknowledged Lieberman’s contribution. For example, in a 1973 article in the New York Daily News, Gimbel said “Lori is only 20 and she really is a very private person. She told us about this strong experience she had listening to McLean (“I felt all flushed with fever / Embarrassed by the crowd / I felt he had found my letters / And read each one out loud / I prayed that he would finish / But he kept just right on…”) I had a notion this might make a good song so the three of us discussed it. We talked it over several times, just as we did with the rest of the numbers we wrote for the album and we all felt it had possibilities.”

Lori Lieberman, 1972

View: https://youtu.be/ua4n_sTa9f4


Roberta Flack, 1973

View: https://youtu.be/DEbi_YjpA-Y


Fugees, 1996

View: https://youtu.be/H-RBJNqdnoM


Tomorrow: Get the cameras rolling
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
722
1,322
Dave's Song of the Day

More, More, More – Andrea True Connection

Thursday song of the day: Today’s song was recorded by a porn star trying to launder her money.




Andrea Marie Truden had a career in pornographic films from the late 1960s to the early 1980s, appearing in over fifty films under the name Andrea True. In 1975 she was in Jamaica filming some commercials for a real estate developer when the Jamaican government prohibited transferring money out of the country in response to U.S. sanctions. What this meant for True was that she couldn’t leave Jamaica with the wages she had earned. Her options were to return to the United States without her money or to spend it in Jamaica before going home. As a way of converting the cash into something of value that she could take back to the States, she decided to record some music. She had a background in music and was considering a professional singing career anyway, so she hoped that master tapes that she recorded in Jamaica would have some value in the United States.

She called producer Greg Diamond to come to Jamaica to assist her, and he wrote the disco song More, More, More in about an hour. Naturally, it was a barely disguised song about sex, with the exhortation to “get the cameras rolling” in keeping with True’s porn background. More, More, More was recorded using local studio musicians and credited to the Andrea True Connection. Upon returning to the States, the song was released by Buddah Records. Initially, it was released only to discos in late 1975 and early 1976, and not to the general public. When it turned out to be popular in clubs, Buddah decided to release it to stores as a single in February 1976. The 12-inch disco version was a longer six-minute edit, while the 7-inch single was divided into two three-minute parts, with Part 1 on the A side of the record and Part 2 on the B side. It sold well, and More, More, More (Part 1) rose to #4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

The gambit of using music to get her money out of Jamaica worked, and Andrea True’s investment in recording More, More, More paid back much more than what she spent, and created a second career for her as well. She had another disco hit, N.Y., You Got Me Dancing, in 1977. That song made it to #27 on the Hot 100. She continued recording with diminishing success until 1980, when a vocal cord surgery affected her voice and she retired from the music business. Andrea True died in November 2011 of heart failure at the age of 68.

Full-length version

View: https://youtu.be/73RYirgeLV4


Single version

View: https://youtu.be/G9y7iglijMQ


Tomorrow: Another bride, another groom