General internet famous : where are they now?

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4070

Guest
monkey puppet/ awkward monkey







origin


"The actual puppet was a character in a Japanese children's TV show called Ōkiku naru Ko or (in English) Growing Children, which ran from the years 1959 to 1988.

The meme was first popularized by the Spanish-speaking portion of the internet. It usually featured captions referring to everyday annoyances, with images of the monkey puppet looking sad and pleading and the words "No ahora, porfavor" ("Not now, please") placed below the image.

Clips of the original TV show were uploaded on Youtube with English subtitles, and were eventually converted into a reaction GIF. "


 
4

4070

Guest
confused anime guy





origin

"Confused anime dude is actually supposed to be confused — because he’s an android whose programming isn’t quite right. His name is Katori Yutaro, and he’s the hero of the 1991 anime Taiyou no Yuusha Fighbird (Brave of the Sun Fighbird). In the scene that spawned the meme, as a newly emerged android, he’s making comically incorrect statements and misidentifying various things around him.

This scene began to surface as a meme in 2011, specifically the moment when he misidentifies the butterfly, though the moment when he misidentifies some tulips is also used. Originally, it was just used in the form of the original screencap of the anime itself, complete with “Is this a pigeon?” caption. It was a straightforward reaction image without any alteration — a way of calling attention to moments of strangeness or confusion on the internet.

In March 2018, however, this viral tweet repurposed the meme by replacing its elements.

has this been done yet? pic.twitter.com/fdHfNEMaBL

— chava aybby (@chvschpr) March 31, 2018
This tweet brought back the meme in a major way and launched its current form, in which it no longer functions as a simple reaction but carries a host of layered new meanings.

In March 2018, however, this viral tweet repurposed the meme by replacing its elements. "

 
4

4070

Guest
yes, this is dog





origin

"The photograph of the black Labrador originated from the 1984 Serbian film Pejzaži u magli ("Foggy Landscapes"), directed by Serbian director Jovan Jovanovic. The scene is shown at 2:15 in the film:

 
4

4070

Guest
you gonna get raped (william todd)

then








his story

"In 1993 a photographer named Matt Kenlon was sent to cover the Mississippi River Flooding.
In November 1994 the photographer met a homeless man named William Todd in the town of Biloxi, Mississippi. Kenlon asked Todd if he could take some photos… the results:








The photos were published in a coffee table book produced by McLaren Press in 1996 called "America's Refuse: Homeless in the Heartland."

In 2001, the something awful forums began hosting a scanned version of one of the photos -- the one with the fierce, vaguely threatening stare, glowering through that intimidating hood:
The words "You gonna get raped" were written on it. From this point onward, the man would become known as the "You're Gonna Get Raped Guy"."



more on his life and how he was fired for being this meme :

"THE REST OF THE STORY: William Todd

"That picture... it haunts me. The violent eyes, the dark, sweaty skin, that rough, tangly beard. You think to yourself: that man right there's got some troubles. That's not what I ever wanted to put forward."

At 62, William Todd has led a tough life. He is one of the hundreds of thousands displaced in Biloxi, Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina. Todd lives in FEMA trailer lot 117C, three miles from where his family's home once stood. A day before the storm approached, on August 28th, 2005, Todd loaded his three children and his wife Gladys into a neighbor's minivan and drove north, to Memphis. When he returned to his home two weeks later, everything was gone.

"My employer... he'd come back to town before I did and tried to warn me and my wife, but there's no preparing for it. Everything we had, everything I'd worked on in the last ten years, it was gone."

Todd says he's back to square one, but it's not the first time. Twelve years ago, he was homeless, a recovering crack c ocaine addict trying to survive on the streets of Biloxi while staying off the pipe. He doesn't like to talk much about what led him to drugs, except that chronic unemployment created a vicious cycle that was hard to break. A great deal of William's time was spent at the Gaston Hewes Recreation Center (also since destroyed by Katrina). The Hewes center housed the Feed My Sheep soup kitchen, and it's where he came to eat, take a nap, and play some checkers.

"When you're homeless, it's the only place you can go to find people who'll talk to you."

That's where Todd met Matt Kenlon, a freelance photographer living in Biloxi. Matt had recently come back from Hannibal, Missouri, where he worked for the Quincy Herald-Whig in covering the Mississippi River flooding of 1993. There he says he saw utter and complete devastation.

"It put me in touch with people whose lives were forever altered and ruined," Kenlon says, "and there, was, I guess, a connection with those people. I felt like I had to tell the stories of those less fortunate."

When he returned to Biloxi, Kenlon began spending his time on the streets. "It's not especially the safest thing to do, and not really the most profitable, but it was something I wanted to devote some time to." Matt met William Todd in November of 1994 at Feed My Sheep.

"Matt asked me if he could take my picture," William recalls. "I said 'sure, but let's go to Winn-Dixie first.' He took me over and I got some fruit and vegetables."

Kenlon shot William's pictures behind the Hewes center, against a plain slate wall. "Most of them were unremarkable. One shot, though, stood out. The anger and hurt in his eyes. I sold that picture a month later."

The photo was published in a coffee table book produced by McLaren Press in 1996 called "America's Refuse: Homeless in the Heartland." Matt was able to bring William a copy at his very own apartment. Todd had been clean and sober for more than two years, and had managed to hold down a job delivering newspapers for over a year. He'd restarted his life at 52.

That should have been the end of William Todd's story. Five years later, everything changed.

"When I went to the market, people started looking at me funny." By then he'd married Gladys Parker and adopted her three sons, Julius, Tyrone and Bo. Julius was sixteen in 2001 and when the family bought a computer, he began spending most of his time online.

"I was hanging out in chatrooms, message boards, things like SomethingAwful.com or Fark.com, and then, all of a sudden, I see my stepdad's face." Julius took it rough. "Someone was using it as a joke, I guess. I was afraid to say something, I didn't know what it meant or why it was."

Someone had scanned the picture of Todd from America's Refuse and placed it online as a sort of punchline. Julius wasn't the first Biloxi native to notice. The picture was forwarded to inboxes across town. Todd was, by then, a supervisor at the newspaper. At his next employee review, the picture surfaced. He didn't know what to say. He was let go. William was jobless for six months after that.

Things are different now. William works for a contractor that's rebuilding several buildings in Biloxi-- including the Hewes Center. Todd still doesn't know what to say about the picture.

"It makes me sick... when I see it. I see someone who might be capable of such things, I see someone I don't recognize. Who's not redeemable. You know, I see a rapist, I really do. And that scares me."

And that's... the REST of the STORY! "
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Rhino

Channel Moderator
Jun 22, 2015
5,888
13,793
you gonna get raped (william todd)

then








his story

"In 1993 a photographer named Matt Kenlon was sent to cover the Mississippi River Flooding.
In November 1994 the photographer met a homeless man named William Todd in the town of Biloxi, Mississippi. Kenlon asked Todd if he could take some photos… the results:








The photos were published in a coffee table book produced by McLaren Press in 1996 called "America's Refuse: Homeless in the Heartland."

In 2001, the something awful forums began hosting a scanned version of one of the photos -- the one with the fierce, vaguely threatening stare, glowering through that intimidating hood:
The words "You gonna get raped" were written on it. From this point onward, the man would become known as the "You're Gonna Get Raped Guy"."



more on his life and how he was fired for being this meme :

"THE REST OF THE STORY: William Todd

"That picture... it haunts me. The violent eyes, the dark, sweaty skin, that rough, tangly beard. You think to yourself: that man right there's got some troubles. That's not what I ever wanted to put forward."

At 62, William Todd has led a tough life. He is one of the hundreds of thousands displaced in Biloxi, Mississippi after Hurricane Katrina. Todd lives in FEMA trailer lot 117C, three miles from where his family's home once stood. A day before the storm approached, on August 28th, 2005, Todd loaded his three children and his wife Gladys into a neighbor's minivan and drove north, to Memphis. When he returned to his home two weeks later, everything was gone.

"My employer... he'd come back to town before I did and tried to warn me and my wife, but there's no preparing for it. Everything we had, everything I'd worked on in the last ten years, it was gone."

Todd says he's back to square one, but it's not the first time. Twelve years ago, he was homeless, a recovering crack c ocaine addict trying to survive on the streets of Biloxi while staying off the pipe. He doesn't like to talk much about what led him to drugs, except that chronic unemployment created a vicious cycle that was hard to break. A great deal of William's time was spent at the Gaston Hewes Recreation Center (also since destroyed by Katrina). The Hewes center housed the Feed My Sheep soup kitchen, and it's where he came to eat, take a nap, and play some checkers.

"When you're homeless, it's the only place you can go to find people who'll talk to you."

That's where Todd met Matt Kenlon, a freelance photographer living in Biloxi. Matt had recently come back from Hannibal, Missouri, where he worked for the Quincy Herald-Whig in covering the Mississippi River flooding of 1993. There he says he saw utter and complete devastation.

"It put me in touch with people whose lives were forever altered and ruined," Kenlon says, "and there, was, I guess, a connection with those people. I felt like I had to tell the stories of those less fortunate."

When he returned to Biloxi, Kenlon began spending his time on the streets. "It's not especially the safest thing to do, and not really the most profitable, but it was something I wanted to devote some time to." Matt met William Todd in November of 1994 at Feed My Sheep.

"Matt asked me if he could take my picture," William recalls. "I said 'sure, but let's go to Winn-Dixie first.' He took me over and I got some fruit and vegetables."

Kenlon shot William's pictures behind the Hewes center, against a plain slate wall. "Most of them were unremarkable. One shot, though, stood out. The anger and hurt in his eyes. I sold that picture a month later."

The photo was published in a coffee table book produced by McLaren Press in 1996 called "America's Refuse: Homeless in the Heartland." Matt was able to bring William a copy at his very own apartment. Todd had been clean and sober for more than two years, and had managed to hold down a job delivering newspapers for over a year. He'd restarted his life at 52.

That should have been the end of William Todd's story. Five years later, everything changed.

"When I went to the market, people started looking at me funny." By then he'd married Gladys Parker and adopted her three sons, Julius, Tyrone and Bo. Julius was sixteen in 2001 and when the family bought a computer, he began spending most of his time online.

"I was hanging out in chatrooms, message boards, things like SomethingAwful.com or Fark.com, and then, all of a sudden, I see my stepdad's face." Julius took it rough. "Someone was using it as a joke, I guess. I was afraid to say something, I didn't know what it meant or why it was."

Someone had scanned the picture of Todd from America's Refuse and placed it online as a sort of punchline. Julius wasn't the first Biloxi native to notice. The picture was forwarded to inboxes across town. Todd was, by then, a supervisor at the newspaper. At his next employee review, the picture surfaced. He didn't know what to say. He was let go. William was jobless for six months after that.

Things are different now. William works for a contractor that's rebuilding several buildings in Biloxi-- including the Hewes Center. Todd still doesn't know what to say about the picture.

"It makes me sick... when I see it. I see someone who might be capable of such things, I see someone I don't recognize. Who's not redeemable. You know, I see a rapist, I really do. And that scares me."

And that's... the REST of the STORY! "
That is rough.... It makes you think about the memes you post. Thinking that they are just funny pictures, but how something like this can affect someone's life and world.... It's crazy
 
4

4070

Guest
Chad Stahl's infamous portrait tattoo




three months after he and his wife Mindy were married, she was tragically killed in a house fire leaving him to raise their three children alone. he got this tattoo to memorialize her.. a while after it became viral, a tattoo artist fixed it for him
 

Banjaxo

Fight the Power
Nov 16, 2019
956
1,821
Chad Stahl's infamous portrait tattoo




three months after he and his wife Mindy were married, she was tragically killed in a house fire leaving him to raise their three children alone. he got this tattoo to memorialize her.. a while after it became viral, a tattoo artist fixed it for him
That's the first time I've heard the story behind that shitty tat, I'm glad to see that someone who knows what they are doing has fixed it for him.
 

Rhino

Channel Moderator
Jun 22, 2015
5,888
13,793
hell yeah mother fucker (zanger bob \ Bob Offenberg)

then





now


There is literally not one thing about this guy's face that doesn't scream "PUNCH ME!!!!". It does make me laugh that he has every cliche headshot pose in all the pictures... Child actor still trying to make it in the biz right there.
 

THE GILF HUNTER

Formerly 'Robbie Hart'
Feb 13, 2015
40,301
42,970
There is literally not one thing about this guy's face that doesn't scream "PUNCH ME!!!!". It does make me laugh that he has every cliche headshot pose in all the pictures... Child actor still trying to make it in the biz right there.
He looks like he’s a decent guy, you’re reading it all wrong
 
4

4070

Guest
There is literally not one thing about this guy's face that doesn't scream "PUNCH ME!!!!". It does make me laugh that he has every cliche headshot pose in all the pictures... Child actor still trying to make it in the biz right there.
then


now

 
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Splinty

Shake 'em off
Admin
Dec 31, 2014
34,158
69,568
There is literally not one thing about this guy's face that doesn't scream "PUNCH ME!!!!". It does make me laugh that he has every cliche headshot pose in all the pictures... Child actor still trying to make it in the biz right there.
Hater
 
4

4070

Guest
discovered that this meme photo was a face swap



 
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4

4070

Guest
Joseph Ducreux \ Archaic rap


Joseph Ducreux was an 18th Century French artist known for a peculiar style of portrait paintings. In 2009, his particularly quirky self-portrait joined the world of internet memes when superimposed with rap lyrics. The words often featured on these memes include an archaic reinterpretation of the original lyrics with an 18th Century spin.

 
4

4070

Guest
alex from target (Alex Christopher LaBeouf )

then





now





story

 
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4

4070

Guest
fat kid dancing (Jessica Leonard)

then






now





she lost the weight at one time but gained some of it back

 
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