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psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

Another Saturday Night – Sam Cooke

Saturday song of the day: Today’s song was inspired by the singer’s stay in a London hotel that banned female visitors to male guests’ rooms.





In 1962, singer Sam Cooke was touring England with Little Richard. His accommodations one night were in a London hotel that prohibited males from having female guests up to their rooms. Apparently, this led to a rather boring night for Cooke, In response, he wrote Another Saturday Night, about a lonely guy who has no prospects for female companionship.

Early the next year, Cooke recorded Another Saturday Night for his next album, Ain’t That Good News. Released as a single in April 1963 (well before the album was released), the song was a hit, placing at #1 on the R&B chart and #10 on the overall Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Cooke was shot and killed in a hotel in December 1964, under disputed circumstances. The hotel manager claims she shot him in self-defense, but Cooke’s family and friends pointed out flaws in her story. No charges were ever filed.

In 1974, Cat Stevens recorded a cover of Another Saturday Night. His version was a slightly bigger hit than the Sam Cooke original, placing at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Sam Cooke, 1963

View: https://youtu.be/yaBkIstHkD0


Cat Stevens, 1974

View: https://youtu.be/_3SLr5pT2e8


Tomorrow: You say how, and I’ll say when
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

We Gotta Get You a Woman – Runt

Sunday song of the day: Today’s song was a solo work initially credited to a band.




In the late 1960s, Todd Rundgren was a member of Nazz, a band that had a few minor hits. Rundgren left the band in 1969 and embarked on a solo career. Instead of working as Todd Rundgren, however, he recorded his first album as a member of the band Runt. Runt consisted of Rundgren, drummer Hunt Sales, and bassist Tony Fox Sales. The Sales brothers were sons of TV personality Soupy Sales, and are more well known as members of David Bowie’s band Tin Machine in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

While Runt was nominally a band, the reality was that it was essentially a Todd Rundgren solo project. For the first album, Rundgren wrote all the songs, sang lead vocals, played most of the instruments, and acted as the record’s producer. The Sales brothers did not appear at all on four of the tracks, and on the other six just played bass and drums. The Runt album was released in August 1970 and was credited to the band as a whole.

The first single from the album was released a few months later, in October 1970. This was We Gotta Get You a Woman. Oddly, the song was listed on the album as We Got to Get You a Woman, but the single changed the title to We Gotta Get You a Woman. It is more well known by the title used on the single, and later pressings of the Runt album changed the title to match that wording.

We Gotta Get You a Woman consisted of the singer suggesting to his friend Leroy that he was in a rut and that the two should work on finding a female companion for Leroy. The song was actually based on Rundgren’s friendship with music executive Paul Fishkin. Rundgren felt that Fishkin had difficulty finding a girlfriend, and this notion inspired the conversation, with the fictional Leroy standing in for Paul Fishkin because the name simply worked better in the flow of the lyrics. Rundgren later explained, “I just couldn’t figure out how to make a clever rhyme with the word Paul, ‘Hey, y’all Paul’ – maybe I could’ve done that. But it was just a name I picked out of the air.” The kicker at the end of the song was that the singer was in a similar circumstance as Leroy, adding “And when we’re through with you, We’ll get me one too.”

The song was a hit, making it to #20 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, despite a small controversy with one of the lyrics. The song contained the line “They may be stupid, but they sure are fun.” Some felt that the line was demeaning to women. Rundgren intended the line to refer to some individuals, not all women, saying “Just because I used the word ‘stupid,’ they think I was referring to women. I’m not referring to women, I’m talking about stupid little characteristics that people have.”

While it was a hit for Runt at the time, later pressings of both the single and the Runt album changed the credit to Todd Rundgren as a solo artist. While Rundgren went on to have several hits as a recording artist (including 1983’s Bang the Drum All Day, which was Song of the Day for April 20th, 2020, here: Bang the Drum All Day – Todd Rundgren ). While he has had a successful recording career both as a solo performer and member of the band Utopia, he is just as well-known as a writer and producer, working with such acts as Badfinger, Meat Loaf, Grand Funk Railroad, The New York Dolls, and many others.

View: https://youtu.be/-J2XARbp4-U


Tomorrow: Woke up in a daze
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

When We Was Fab – George Harrison

Monday song of the day: Today’s song is about the singer’s former band.




While on a 1986 trip to Australia, George Harrison and Jeff Lynne improvised a bit of music that Harrison felt sounded like that of The Beatles. At the time the Beatles had been broken up for about seventeen years and Harrison had had a long and successful solo career. He gave the music the working title “Aussie-Fab” because it was written in Australia and was reminiscent of the Beatles, or the “Fab Four.”

The next year, when he and Lynne started working on Harrison’s album Cloud Nine, they took the “Aussie-Fab” cassette and decided to create a song on the album based on the composition. When he was ready to write lyrics to go along with the music, Harrison decided to use the word “Fab” and make the song a nostalgic remembrance of his old band. The result was When We Was Fab. Former bandmate Ringo Starr played drums on the record. Cloud Nine was released in November 1987, and When We Was Fab was released as the second single from the album in January 1988. The first single, I Got My Mind Set on You, was a huge hit at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. When We Was Fab didn’t do nearly as well but was still a hit at a respectable #23 on the Hot 100.

The video that went along with the song was quite innovative for the time and contained many visual references to The Beatles, just as the song itself contained musical references. Ringo appeared in several places during the video, and one segment showed a left-handed man in a walrus mask playing bass. This obviously represented Paul McCartney, the left-handed bass player. The Beatles song Glass Onion from 1968 contained the line “The Walrus was Paul.” Harrison at the time said that it was in fact Paul, but that “he was camera shy that day and he kept his walrus mask on.” Several years later, McCartney said that “George wanted me to be in it but I wasn’t available. So I suggested that he put someone else in the walrus and tell everyone that it was me.”

The other Beatle, John Lennon, had been killed in 1980, so the video included him by having Neil Aspinall, who had been The Beatles’ road manager, walk by carrying a copy of Lennon’s Imagine album.

View: https://youtu.be/AVu6nPTVbBQ


Tomorrow: I’ve popped a lot of pills
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

The Pusher – Steppenwolf

Tuesday song of the day: Today’s song wasn’t a hit when it was released but has endured due to its use in the movie Easy Rider.




Songwriter Hoyt Axton wrote a song about drug dealers in the mid-1960s after a friend of his died from a drug overdose. Axton was the son of Mae Boren Axton, who co-wrote Heartbreak Hotel for Elvis in the 1950s. Hoyt became quite a successful songwriter in his own right in the 1960s and 1970s, writing hits such as Never Been to Spain, Joy to the World, and No No Song for other artists. He was also a recording artist himself, but never had a big hit as a performer. Later, he had another successful career as a character actor in television and movies. One of his more well-known roles was as the inventor father of the main character in Gremlins, who brings his son the Mogwai as a Christmas present.

The song he wrote after his friend died was The Pusher, which told how dealers of hard drugs were evil, and sold their wares without any concern about the health of the user. They would happily get people hooked on drugs that would eventually kill them if there was money in it.

Canadian band The Sparrows began playing The Pusher in their shows around 1966. There were some personnel changes and a name change to Sparrow later in the year. Then in 1967, leader John Kay changed the band’s name to Steppenwolf. They released their first single in late 1967, and their first album, Steppenwolf, in January 1968. That first single went nowhere, but the second was Born to Be Wild, a huge hit that went to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. The follow-up to this classic was The Pusher, but that song failed to chart at all.

Then in 1969, Dennis Hopper directed the landmark film Easy Rider, about a duo who make a cross-country motorcycle trip financed by a drug sale. Both Born to Be Wild and The Pusher appeared on the soundtrack of the film. Its use in the movie ensured the popularity of The Pusher for years to come, despite it not having been a hit on its initial release. Later, previously unreleased recordings of Sparrow performing The Pusher were released, in both live and studio versions. The live version was released on an album called Early Steppenwolf, although the performance on record was before the name change to Steppenwolf. The studio version was released as being performed by John Kay and Sparrow, also to cash in on the success of Steppenwolf.

As for Hoyt Axton, he didn’t record The Pusher for one of his own albums until 1971, when it appeared on his Joy to the World album. His version is considerably different than Steppenwolf’s hard rock take on the song.

Steppenwolf, 1968

View: https://youtu.be/Zv6PY1BQLBE


Sparrow, circa 1967

View: https://youtu.be/eBo5GL48xP8


Hoyt Axton, 1971

View: https://youtu.be/T22H-CUnx5E


Tomorrow: Left the city in a pickup truck
 
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psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

Della and the Dealer – Hoyt Axton

Wednesday song of the day: Today’s song gained some popularity due to the singer performing it on a network sitcom.




Yesterday’s song was The Pusher by Steppenwolf, which has become a classic because it was used on the soundtrack of the film Easy Rider. The writer of The Pusher, Hoyt Axton, had a similar situation – albeit on a much smaller scale – with his 1979 song Della and the Dealer.

Della and the Dealer was a country-tinged song that told the tale a woman, her boyfriend, their dog and their cat. They left their town seeking adventure, and there was a violent encounter in a Tuscon bar because the Dealer was jealous of a guitar player flirting with Della.

A lot about the song was ambiguous. First, it is unclear whether Jake the Dog and Kalamazoo the Cat were animals or people, since Axton had them doing things that animals couldn’t. I like to think they were meant to literally be a dog and a cat. In 1979, calling people “Dog” wasn’t a common practice yet, although referring to people as “cats” had been done by hipsters for decades. Second, Hoyt Axton had given animals human qualities before in his songs, most famously the bullfrog Jeremiah in Three Dog Night’s #1 hit Joy to the World. As you can see from the image above, in recognition of his biggest hit, Axton called his record label Jeremiah and had a bullfrog as the company’s mascot.

A second detail that was left to listeners to decide for themselves was who escaped the barroom killing. It was clear that Della, Jake, and Kalamazoo got away, but the other of the four was referred to as “her lover” and not specifically as “the Dealer.” This gives the impression that it could be the guitar player. But it could also very well be the Dealer, just not identified by name.

Around the time the record was released, Hoyt Axton appeared on an episode of WKRP in Cincinnati as an old suitor of the receptionist Jennifer, played by Loni Anderson. During the course of the show, he performed two songs, one of which was Della and the Dealer. This helped the record get some further airplay and eventually the song made it to #17 on the Billboard Country Music chart. It failed to chart at all on the overall Hot 100, however. While Axton wrote some songs that became big hits for other artists, he never had one of his own recordings break into the overall Top 40.

View: https://youtu.be/xWFe_x2Huz0


Tomorrow: When I heard this woman sing a song
 

Grateful Dude

TMMAC Addict
May 30, 2016
6,152
9,296
Dave's Song of the Day

The Pusher – Steppenwolf

Tuesday song of the day: Today’s song wasn’t a hit when it was released but has endured due to its use in the movie Easy Rider.




Songwriter Hoyt Axton wrote a song about drug dealers in the mid-1960s after a friend of his died from a drug overdose. Axton was the son of Mae Boren Axton, who co-wrote Heartbreak Hotel for Elvis in the 1950s. Hoyt became quite a successful songwriter in his own right in the 1960s and 1970s, writing hits such as Never Been to Spain, Joy to the World, and No No Song for other artists. He was also a recording artist himself, but never had a big hit as a performer. Later, he had another successful career as a character actor in television and movies. One of his more well-known roles was as the inventor father of the main character in Gremlins, who brings his son the Mogwai as a Christmas present.

The song he wrote after his friend died was The Pusher, which told how dealers of hard drugs were evil, and sold their wares without any concern about the health of the user. They would happily get people hooked on drugs that would eventually kill them if there was money in it.

Canadian band The Sparrows began playing The Pusher in their shows around 1966. There were some personnel changes and a name change to Sparrow later in the year. Then in 1967, leader John Kay changed the band’s name to Steppenwolf. They released their first single in late 1967, and their first album, Steppenwolf, in January 1968. That first single went nowhere, but the second was Born to Be Wild, a huge hit that went to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100. The follow-up to this classic was The Pusher, but that song failed to chart at all.

Then in 1969, Dennis Hopper directed the landmark film Easy Rider, about a duo who make a cross-country motorcycle trip financed by a drug sale. Both Born to Be Wild and The Pusher appeared on the soundtrack of the film. It use in the movie ensured the popularity of The Pusher for years to come, despite it not having been a hit on its initial release. Later, previously unreleased recordings of Sparrow performing The Pusher were released, in both live and studio versions. The live version was released on an album called Early Steppenwolf, although the performance on record was before the name change to Steppenwolf. The studio version was released as being performed by John Kay and Sparrow, also to cash in on the success of Steppenwolf.

As for Hoyt Axton, he didn’t record The Pusher for one of his own albums until 1971, when it appeared on his Joy to the World album. His version is considerably different than Steppenwolf’s hard rock take on the song.

Steppenwolf, 1968

View: https://youtu.be/Zv6PY1BQLBE


Sparrow, circa 1967

View: https://youtu.be/eBo5GL48xP8


Hoyt Axton, 1971

View: https://youtu.be/T22H-CUnx5E


Tomorrow: Left the city in a pickup truck
This is such a great song. I really dig these music posts you do man, thanks!

Just to piggy back on your post, here are a couple more versions of The Pusher

Nina Simone
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obHNVRDu-AA



And Blind Melon's version. This is a lot different than the original, but I really like their take on it and think this is a great cover. I loved these guys back in the mid 90s.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvbuenElD7M
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

Long Cool Woman (In a Black Dress) – The Hollies

Thursday song of the day: Today’s song is about an FBI agent who encounters a beautiful woman in a seedy bar.




The Hollies recorded their eleventh album, Distant Light, in 1971. It was released in the United Kingdom in October of that year but wasn’t released in the United States until April of 1972. Along with the U.S. release came the first single from the album, Long Cool Woman (In a Black Dress).

The band consciously wrote the song in the “swamp rock” style of Creedence Clearwater Revival, and lead singer Anthony Clarke imitated CCR singer John Fogerty during the song. The Hollies claim to have written the song very quickly, and it tells the odd story of an FBI agent working on a case in a bar, encountering the titular “long cool woman” there, and both of them escaping the bar after a shooting. Not that the lyrics matter much. Aside from some key lines, many of the words are hard to make out from Clarke’s stylized singing. Despite that, the song works well.

Between the time Distant Light was recorded and the release of the album and the single in the United States the next year, Clarke had left The Hollies. Long Cool Woman (In a Black Dress) – with the title also sometimes listed as Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress on some records or simply Long Cool Woman in other places – was only a minor hit in the band’s native United Kingdom, topping out at #32 on the UK Singles chart. It was a much bigger hit in the United States, peaking at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 and selling 1.5 million copies in the U.S. While Anthony Clarke had left The Hollies before the song was released, the fact that it was such a big hit led to him returning to the band in 1973.

View: https://youtu.be/g8XiNKsKyVk



Tomorrow: Let me love you till I get it right
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

Oh Sheila – Ready for the World

Friday song of the day: Many people thought today’s song was recorded by Prince.




The band Ready for the World released their self-titled debut album in 1985. The album included two earlier singles that preceded the album but did not make the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Then the single Oh Sheila was released, and that song proved to be very popular.

Musically, Oh Sheila was pop/funk. It resembled some of Prince’s work at the time, and lead singer Melvin Riley, Jr. had a voice that sounded similar to Prince’s, so a fair amount of radio listeners just assumed that it was a Prince record. Some even theorized that it was about Prince protégé Sheila E. It wasn’t.

Despite the confusion (and the cheesy fake-British accent Riley used on the intro…), Oh Sheila was a huge hit, reaching #1 on the Hot 100. Despite having a #1 hit, Ready for the World could not sustain a long, successful career. They had two more hits in 1985 and 1986, including the #9 Love You Down, but after that, they never again broke the Billboard Hot 100, and the group disbanded in 1991.

View: https://youtu.be/wbL2lMn34Oo


Tomorrow: In my heart I have but one desire
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire – The Ink Spots

Saturday song of the day: Today’s song wasn’t recorded until a few years after it was written.




In 1938 the team of Bennie Benjamin, Eddie Durham, Sol Marcus, and Eddie Seiler wrote I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire, a song about how the singer just wants to set a fire in the heart of his or her lover. The song sat around for a while, and the first recording was made in March 1940 by the band Harlan Leonard and His Rockets, with Myra Taylor providing the vocals. It was not a huge hit, but popular enough to spur several other artists to record cover versions the next year.

One of the most successful of these covers was by popular vocal group The Ink Spots, who released their version in August 1941. It reached #4 on the U.S. pop chart. Another version by Horace Heidt and his Musical Knights was a bigger hit at the time, reaching #1 on the pop chart, but it is the Ink Spots version of I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire that has endured over the years.

The Ink Spots, 1941

View: https://youtu.be/TmIwm5RElRs


Harlan Leonard and His Rockets (vocal by Myra Taylor), 1940

View: https://youtu.be/oInp0S-Vayg


Horace Heidt and his Musical Knights, 1941

View: https://youtu.be/fW02pY8qUMg


Tomorrow: Why do I need you so?
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

Build Me Up Buttercup – The Foundations

Sunday song of the day: Today’s song is about a girl who is giving mixed signals to her boyfriend.




English soul band The Foundations released Build Me Up Buttercup in 1968. The song, written by Mike d’Abo and Tony Macaulay, had the singer imploring his girlfriend to stop alternating between treating him badly and treating him well, or as the song puts it, repeatedly building him up and then letting him down.

The song was a hit, placing at #2 on the UK singles chart and #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States. It sold over a million copies in the United States. The Foundations had had a #11 hit with their debut single Baby Now That I’ve Found You in 1967. Build Me Up Buttercup was their second hit and ended up being their last. The Foundations released a few more records, but never again cracked the Top 40 before breaking up in late 1970.

View: https://youtu.be/QbuSu1b-ejs


Tomorrow: Well I’m so tired of cryin’
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

On the Road Again – Canned Heat

Monday song of the day: Today’s song is based on two 1950s songs that were themselves based on a song from the 1920s.




Canned Heat specialized in blues rock. Formed in 1965, they released their second album, Boogie with Canned Heat, in 1968. Included on the album was the song On the Road Again (not to be confused with the later Willie Nelson song with the same title). The song told of a lonely man who had to travel alone.

Canned Heat based their song on two earlier records by bluesman Floyd Jones. The main inspiration was also titled On the Road Again, which Jones released in 1953. That song was itself sort of a sequel to Floyd Jones’s 1951 Dark Road. The Canned Heat song used lyrics from both Jones records, and the songwriting credits included Floyd Jones as well as Canned Heat’s Alan Wilson, since Wilson used some lyrics and musical ideas from Jones.

The lineage doesn’t end there, however, since both Floyd Jones records were based on Big Road Blues, a record that Tommy Johnson released in 1928. Canned Heat were no doubt aware of this, since the band itself took its name from Canned Heat Blues, another 1928 Tommy Johnson record.

Canned Heat’s single was released in April 1968 and made it to #16 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It was Canned Heat’s first hit. They had two more, the #11 Going Up the Country in 1968 and Let’s Work Together in 1970. Two original members left the band early in 1970, and in September 1970 leader and main songwriter Alan Wilson died of an overdose. The band carried on, but its popularity faded after the loss of Wilson.

Canned Heat, 1968

View: https://youtu.be/CEwyoo3fT8w


Floyd Jones, Dark Road, 1951

View: https://youtu.be/vKL5Wk-BLAo


Floyd Jones, On the Road Again, 1953

View: https://youtu.be/KkU6keCtkzE


Tommy Johnson, Big Road Blues, 1928

View: https://youtu.be/VU6eLg3GWuA


Tomorrow: We’re the best of friends
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

On the Road Again – Willie Nelson

Tuesday song of the day: Today’s song was written on a barf bag during an airplane flight.




Yesterday’s song was On the Road Again by Canned Heat. Today’s song is also On the Road Again, but it’s an entirely different song that shares the same title. While the Canned Heat song was about being sad and alone on the road, the Willie Nelson record is much happier, telling of a musician traveling the country with his friends in the band.

Willie Nelson had recently signed on to star in Honeysuckle Rose, which would be his first starring role in a film, when one of the film’s produces asked him if he could write a song for the movie. They were on an airplane at the time. Nelson asked the producer what he wanted to song to be about, and the answer was that it could be something about life on the road for a musician. With that seed of an idea, Nelson quickly wrote out some lyrics on an air sickness bag. He later added music and recorded On the Road Again for the movie’s soundtrack.

The single was released in August 1980, a few weeks after Honeysuckle Rose opened in theaters. On the Road Again rose to #1 on the Billboard Country & Western chart and peaked at #20 on the overall Hot 100 chart. It later won a Grammy for Best Country Song.

View: https://youtu.be/dBN86y30Ufc



Tomorrow: And I dance with your silhouette
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

C’mon and Get My Love – D Mob Introducing Cathy Dennis

Wednesday song of the day: Today’s song was a collaboration that was released on albums by both artists.




D Mob, the house music project of English producer Dancin’ Danny D, released its first and only album in 1989. The album, titled A Little Bit of This, a Little Bit of That, also featured singer Cathy Dennis on two of the tracks. The first single from the album was C’mon and Get My Love, one of the songs with Dennis providing vocals. The single was credited as “D Mob Introducing Cathy Dennis,” and when Dennis released her own debut album a few months later, C’mon and Get My Love was included on that album as well. The credits on her album, Move to This, listed the song as performed by “Cathy Dennis (with D Mob).” The song was also on the soundtrack to the 1989 Meryl Streep/Roseanne Barr film She-Devil, credited just to D Mob.

The single was a hit, placing at #15 on the UK singles chart. It did even better in the United States, reaching #1 on the Dance Club Songs chart and #10 on the overall Billboard Hot 100. D Mob had a few more dance hits in the early 90s, and Dennis released two more albums in the 1990s. Since then, she has continued to release the occasional single up through 2020, but is now better known as a songwriter and producer.

View: https://youtu.be/CBHRCTMsVk8


Tomorrow: The world outside looks so unkind
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
780
1,370
Dave's Song of the Day

Drift Away – Dobie Gray

Thursday song of the day: Today’s song was written as a country song but later became a huge hit for a soul singer.




Mentor Williams had a long career as a country music songwriter and record producer. He was the younger brother of famed songwriter and actor Paul Williams, and longtime domestic partner of country music superstar Lynn Anderson. One of his most famous songs was Drift Away, written as a country song about the healing powers of music in the early 1970s. Drift Away was first recorded by John Henry Kurtz and appeared on his 1972 album Reunion. It did not chart.

Shortly thereafter, soul singer Dobie Gray recorded a cover version. It was released in February 1973 and was a huge hit, selling over a million copies and rising to #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Drift Away was Gray’s biggest hit and has since become regarded as a classic.

After Dobie Gray’s record became a hit, The Rolling Stones recorded a version during the sessions for their 1974 album It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll. It ended up not being used on the album and remained unreleased, although bootleg copies later emerged.

The song returned to the Top 10 in 2003, when Uncle Kracker released a version. His cover featured Dobie Gray on backing vocals and joining Uncle Kracker for a duet on the final verse, over 30 years after Gray’s hit recording. It placed at #1 on the Adult Contemporary Chart and #9 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Dobie Gray died in December 2011, and Mentor Williams passed away in November 2016.

Dobie Gray, 1973

View: https://youtu.be/OnDu1HHOo78


John Henry Kurtz, 1972

View: https://youtu.be/sxJv8C8uZ_0


The Rolling Stones, 1974 (unreleased)

View: https://youtu.be/tey6tjsq9Vo


Uncle Kracker (Featuring Dobie Gray), 2003

View: https://youtu.be/A69BertdSt4


Tomorrow: The company is crippling me