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MC Gusto

Freeloading Rusty
Jan 11, 2016
12,647
12,746
Ya get nothin' for nothin'
If that's what you do
Turn around bitch I got a use for you
Besides you ain't got nothin' better to do
And I'm bored
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
647
1,247
Dave's Song of the Day

Little Bit O' Soul – The Music Explosion

Wednesday song of the day: Today’s song was the only hit by a 1960s garage band from Ohio.



English songwriters John Carter and Ken Lewis wrote a song in 1964 extolling the virtues of music to make your life happier. The song, Little Bit O’ Soul, was recorded the next year by an English band called The Little Darlings, but the record didn’t do much.

Two years later, a band from Ohio called The Music Explosion was auditioning for producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz, who gave them a copy of the Little Darlings record to learn Little Bit O’ Soul for a possible cover version. They recorded the song with a more prominent bass line, and the record was a local hit. It eventually broke nationwide once Kasenetz and Katz shopped the record around to the bigger California radio stations. After this, The Music Explosion version of Little Bit O’ Soul rose to #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and sold over a million copies.

The Music Explosion released several more singles over the next two years, but none broke the Top 40, and most failed to even make the Hot 100 chart. As for Little Bit O’ Soul, it was covered by mostly unknown bands several times in the 1960s and 1970s, then most famously by The Ramones in 1983, and was sampled by 2 Live Crew in 1989.

The Music Explosion, 1967


The Little Darlings, 1965


Tomorrow: No one knows who she is or what her name is
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
647
1,247
Dave's Song of the Day

Hot Child in the City – Nick Gilder

Thursday song of the day: Today’s song was inspired by the singer seeing underage prostitutes walking the streets.



Nick Gilder was the singer for Canadian glam band Sweeney Todd, who had a 1975 #1 hit in Canada with the song Roxy Roller. He later left the band for a solo career and was replaced by a 15-year old named Bryan Adams, who went on to much bigger solo success.

Gilder released his first album, You Know Who You Are, in 1977. It did not chart. The following year, he released his second solo album, City Nights. That album contained the song Hot Child in the City, which was released as a single and became a huge hit.

Most people assume that the song refers to a striking young woman making her way through the city. She catches the singer’s eye and possibly a romance ensues. The use of “child” can be interpreted as hyperbole. The assumption is that the woman in the song is at least 18 years old, and more likely in her early 20s. This, however, is not the case.

Gilder wrote Hot Child in the City after he moved from Vancouver to Los Angeles and noticed prostitutes on the streets of Hollywood. Some of them were obviously underage, and he was moved to write a song about it. Obviously writing it as a straightforward tale of teenage prostitutes would not make a very good pop song, so he kept it vague, and wrote it from the point of view of one of the creepy customers. The result was a song that could be interpreted innocently as just describing a beautiful woman and not specifically an underage hooker. He explains, “I’ve seen a lot of young girls, 15 and 16, walking down Hollywood Boulevard with their pimps. Their home environment drove them to distraction so they ran away, only to be trapped by something even worse. It hurts to see that so I tried writing from the perspective of a lecher – in the guise of an innocent pop song.”

Hot Child in the City rose to #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and was certified as a Platinum single, with sales of over 2 million copies. It was quite a long stretch between when the record was released and when it topped the charts. The Billboard Book of #1 Hits claims that it holds the record for longest period between release and attaining #1 status. The record was released on June 12th, 1978 and finally reached #1 on the Hot 100 on October 28th, 1978, a period of roughly four and a half months.

Gilder never again had a Top 40 hit in the United States, although he did chart at #44 with another song from the City Nights album in December 1978, when he followed up his big hit with the song Here Comes the Night. He continued to record afterward, but had more success as a songwriter for other artists, including Bette Midler, Pat Benatar, and Joe Cocker. His biggest hit as a writer for others came in 1983, when Scandal featuring Patty Smyth had a #7 hit with The Warrior.

In 2000, he re-formed Sweeney Todd and continues to work with the band today.

Single release, 1978


Lip-synched performance on the Dutch TV show Top Pop, 1978


Tomorrow: Your looks are laughable
 

psychicdeath

Member
Jan 21, 2015
647
1,247
Dave's Song of the Day

My Funny Valentine – Ella Fitzgerald

Friday song of the day: Today’s song first appeared in a 1937 Broadway musical and has been covered over 900 times since then.



The musical Babes in Arms opened on Broadway in April 1937 and included two songs that went on to become classics. Written by Rodgers and Hart, probably the most successful musical theater writers of their era, the play had hits in both The Lady is a Tramp and My Funny Valentine.

My Funny Valentine was first performed in the play by Mitzi Green, but as mentioned, it has been recorded by hundreds of artists since then. Strangely, when Babes in Arms was adapted for the screen in 1939, the film starring Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney did not include My Funny Valentine.

The song itself is a sappy love song detailing how even though the love interest had several flaws, the singer didn’t want to change a thing about them. The hundreds of recordings of My Funny Valentine include versions by Frank Sinatra, Mary Martin, Sarah Vaughan, Sammy Davis Jr., Johnny Mathis, Marvin Gaye, and even Elvis Costello. In the 1950s, it was such a standard that one New York City nightclub stopped allowing singers to perform the song in the club.

With hundreds of versions to choose from, I selected just one. This is a 1956 version by Ella Fitzgerald. This version contains an opening section from the play that is usually left out of other versions.


Tomorrow: I don’t care what your Daddy do
 

silentsinger

Momofuku
Jun 23, 2015
21,051
14,449
I need to see them in a non festival setting. I've seen them 3 times and they were really bad. I've seen concerts online and I love them as recording artists so I know they don't suck...just wrong time wrong place. He was better after he lost all the weight though.
 
4

4070

Guest
I need to see them in a non festival setting. I've seen them 3 times and they were really bad. I've seen concerts online and I love them as recording artists so I know they don't suck...just wrong time wrong place. He was better after he lost all the weight though.
ive seen them twice. and yeah they arent great live.. especially in the tail end of their tours. he can scream no problem, but when he sings, it is pretty terrible. he is great in a lot of his music though..from deftones, to teams sleep, crosses, etc..
 

silentsinger

Momofuku
Jun 23, 2015
21,051
14,449
ive seen them twice. and yeah they arent great live.. especially in the tail end of their tours. he can scream no problem, but when he sings, it is pretty terrible. he is great in a lot of his music though..from deftones, to teams sleep, crosses, etc..
Didn't help the last time it was really windy and the acoustics were all screwed up but they still weren't good. Kind of maybe got the impression that they were going through the motions and a dedicated set they might be more into.

I know Tool don't suck, but they sucked at the same festival I saw Deftones at 3 times. Just one of those things.